Valdosta State University
Undergraduate Catalog Excerpts


ADMISSIONS
Mr. Walter Peacock
Director of Admissions


The admission policy of Valdosta State University is designed to admit those students whose academic backgrounds indicate a reasonable potential for success in the educational program of the university. Acceptance is based upon previous academic record, entrance examination scores, good conduct, and, when deemed necessary, results of personal interviews and psychological tests or other appropriate tests required to determine general fitness for admission to an institution of higher learning.

This policy is administered by the Director of Admissions, who makes the final decision as to an applicant's acceptability, subject to the applicant's right of appeal as provided by the bylaws of the University and of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. Any appeal must be made in writing to the Director of Admissions.

The University reserves the right to discontinue accepting admission applications when its enrollment limits have been reached. It reserves the right to reject the application of any individual who is not a legal resident of the State of Georgia. Furthermore, the University reserves the right not to accept the credits of any institution, notwithstanding its accredited status, if the University determines that the quality of instruction available at the institution is for any reason deficient or unsatisfactory.

Payment of fees for the processing of an admission application shall entitle the applicant to have his or her application form reviewed according to normal admissions procedures at the institution. Admission to the institution is not guaranteed by payment of an admissions application fee.

Please be aware that admission to the University does not guarantee admission to your intended major. Several programs of study have additional admission requirements. Information on admission to a particular degree program or major may be found in the appropriate section of this Bulletin.

How To File an Application

Admission application forms will be provided by the Director of Admissions on request. All completed forms must be either on file or postmarked at least 20 days prior to registration and must be accompanied by a nonrefundable, nontransferable $20 application fee to cover the expense of processing the application.

A medical history and certification of immunization form is required of all applicants seeking admission to courses which carry academic credit. Required forms are furnished by the Director of Admissions. An applicant's registration cannot be completed until the medical history and certification of immunization forms have been made available to the University.

Applicants who do not enroll in the semester for which they are accepted must notify the Admissions Office if they wish to enter the University at a later time.

Admission of Beginning Freshmen

Valdosta State selects its beginning freshmen from two groups of applicants: high school graduates and individuals in possession of a Department of Education Certificate awarded on the basis of the General Education Development Tests.

High School Graduates. Applicants must be a graduate of an accredited high school or of a high school that has been approved by the University and must have completed the minimum requirements of the State Department of Education for graduation and must validate the required College Preparatory Curriculum.

The University System of Georgia requires that high school graduates complete the college preparatory curriculum course work for entrance to regular college programs leading to the baccalaureate degree.

The College Entrance Examination Board's Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the Assessment Battery of the American College Testing Program (ACT) is required of all applicants seeking admission from high school. The results of these tests must be filed with the Director of Admissions at least 20 days before the registration date of the proposed semester of entrance. Information pertinent to making application to take these tests may be obtained from the high school principal, the high school guidance counselor, or directly from the College Entrance Examination Board (SAT), P.O. Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6200 or the American College Testing Program (ACT), P.O. Box 168, Iowa City, Iowa 52243.

General Education Development (GED) Tests. Individuals who did not graduate from high school and individuals who did not graduate from an accredited high school approved by the University may be admitted by presenting a State Department of Education Certificate of High School Equivalency and by validating the College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) by making passing scores on SAT II Subject Tests. See College Preparatory Curriculum on page 33. The High School Level GED Test is the testing instrument generally administered to applicants in this group. Satisfactory scores on the SAT or ACT are also required.

Evaluation of Freshmen

A freshman applicant's potential for success in the educational program of the university is gauged on the basis of ACT or SAT scores, high school curriculum, and high school grade point average. After an application form, SAT or ACT scores, high school transcript, and other required records are received and are found to be complete and in order, the applicant's credentials are evaluated. If the applicant's credentials are satisfactory to the University and if the applicant is judged to be acceptable in all other aspects, a formal letter of acceptance is promptly issued by the Director of Admissions.

Regular Freshman Admission Standards

effective summer 1998

1. Applicant must have completed all College Preparatory Curriculum

requirements, and

2. 480 SAT Verbal or ACT English 21, and

3. 440 SAT Math or ACT Math 19, and

4. Freshman Index* (FI) 2040.

*FI = total SAT Score + (500 x high school GPA) ACT scores

will be converted to SAT for FI calculation

Minimum Freshman Admission Requirements - effective summer 1998

1. Applicant must have completed at least four areas of the College

Preparatory Curriculum, and

2. Two of the following three conditions must be met:

a. SAT Verbal 410 or ACT English 16

b. SAT math 390 or ACT math 16

c. Freshman Index 1810, and

3. A passing score on the Compass Placement Exam for admissions to

Valdosta State University is required if:

- your SAT Verbal score is below 430 (ACT English-18) and/or

- your math score is below 400 (ACT math-16) and/or

- you have a deficiency in English or math in the College Preparatory Curriculum.

The College Preparatory Curriculum requirements apply to all students who graduated from high school within the last five years. Transfer students who have not completed a minimum of 30 transferable semester hours are also subject to these requirements if they graduated from high school within the last five years.

Passing scores on SAT II Subject Test will be used in lieu of a high school transcript for students from non-accredited high schools, home schooled students, and for students who hold a GED. The following eight SAT II subject examinations or the appropriate exams as determined by the Office of Admissions are required:

1. Writing/English Composition

2. Literature

3. American History and Social Studies

4. World History/European History

5. Math level IC or Math IIC

6. Biology

7. Chemistry or Physics

8. One of the eight foreign language exams (Chinese, French, German,

Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Spanish)

Learning Assistance

Students admitted to Valdosta State University who do not meet regular freshman admission requirements will enroll in core curriculum courses for credit and may have a mandatory learning assistance component in specified courses. Learning assistance is designed to provide additional academic support, while promoting student success. Learning assistance is also available to any student who desires additional academic support.

Joint Enrollment / Early Admissions

Minimum total SAT score of 1100 with 530 verbal/480 math minimum or minimum score of 25 on Enhanced ACT-Composite with 24 English/21 math minimum and a 3.0 high school academic grade point average.

Admission of Non-Traditional Students

A non-traditional student is defined as a student who has been graduated from high school for a minimum of five years or a student who holds a General Education Diploma (GED) and his or her class has graduated at least five years ago. Students who have been away from formal education and have attempted fewer than 14 semester hours are also eligible for this category.

1. High school graduates with at least a 2.0 academic grade point average will be eligible for admission without submission of SAT/ACT test scores. These students will be required to take a Placement Exam before registration.

2. High school graduates whose academic grade point average is below 2.0 or students who hold a GED must make a minimum combined score of 210 on the reading, English, and math tests of the Collegiate Placement Exam before admission can be granted.

Minimum High School Course Requirements for Unconditional Admissions

College Preparatory Curriculum

Course (Units) Instructional Emphasis

English (4) - Grammar and Usage

- Literature (American & World)

- Advanced composition skills

Mathematics (3) - Two courses in Algebra and one in Geometry

Science (3) - Physical Science

- At least two laboratory courses from Biology,

Physics, Chemistry, or related areas of science

Social Science (3) - American History

- World History

- Economics and Government

Foreign Language (2) - Two courses in one language emphasizing speaking, listening, reading, and writing

The University System will accept algebra I, physical science, and foreign language taken in the eighth grade to fulfill its College Preparatory Curriculum requirements.

Out-of-state high school students may be granted some flexibility in the Social Science area only.

Those students admitted to Valdosta State University with a deficiency in the College Preparatory Curriculum will make up the deficiency in the following manner:

English Students graduating with fewer than the four required units of English will be required to take and pass the Compass Placement Exams in English and reading for admission to the University.

Mathematics Students graduating with fewer than the three required units of mathematics will be required to take and pass the Compass Placement Exam in mathematics for admission to the University.

Science Students graduating with fewer than the three required units of science will be required to complete with a grade of "C" or better a course in a laboratory science chosen from the approved laboratory sciences of the System Core Curriculum. A course used to fulfill a deficiency will not apply toward graduation.

Social Science Students graduating with fewer than the three required units of social science will be required to complete with a grade of "C" or better a three-semester-hour course chosen from the approved social science courses of the System Core Curriculum. A course used to fulfill a deficiency will not apply toward graduation.

Foreign Language Students graduating with fewer than the two required units of the same foreign language will be required to complete with a grade of "C" or better a three-semester-hour introductory foreign language course. A course used to fulfill a deficiency will not apply toward graduation.

All students admitted with a College Preparatory Curriculum deficiency must complete the required course(s) to fulfill the deficiency before accumulating 30 semester hours of credit.

Admission of Transfer Students

A transfer student is defined as one who terminates enrollment in one institution and subsequently enrolls in another. Students who have been enrolled in other institutions are warned that they may not disregard their records in these institutions. Failure to report previous college attendance is considered to be sufficient cause for cancellation of the student's registration and of any credits earned. Students who are enrolled in a Developmental Studies Program within the University System of Georgia are not eligible for transfer admission at Valdosta State University.

Students who are enrolled in joint high school and college programs while still in high school must meet the joint enrollment requirements of the University System of Georgia before credit will be awarded. Current requirements are a minimum SAT of 970 or ACT composite score of 21 and a high school grade point average of 3.00 (B) on a 4.0 scale.

To transfer to Valdosta State University, students must:

1. Request that the Registrar from each institution attended, regardless of length of attendance or amount of credit earned, send an official transcript to VSU's Office of Admissions.

2. Request that your high school counselor send a copy of your high school transcript and SAT/ACT scores if you have earned fewer than 30 semester hours of academic credit.

Admissions applications will be evaluated in accordance with one of the following categories:

1. Students who have completed at least 30 semester hours of academic credit must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 1.80 on all attempted work. If transferring from a University System of Georgia unit, students must have exited any Developmental Studies requirements.

2. Students who graduated from high school within the last five years who have earned fewer than 30 semester hours of academic credit are considered Transfer Freshmen and must satisfy the regulations governing the admission of beginning freshmen as well as those listed in category one above.

3. Students who have been graduated from high school five years or more and have earned fewer than 30 semester hours of academic credit must satisfy the admission requirements in category one above.

As a rule, students entering from institutions which are not members of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools or other regional associations of equal standing must take examinations on the work presented. However, students may be granted the same transfer credit as that accepted by the principal state university in the state in which the credit was earned. Necessary adjustments between students' academic work done at another institution and the requirements for their major program at Valdosta State University shall be the responsibility of each student, working with the head of the department of the student's major, subject to the approval of the dean or director of the appropriate College or Division.

Students will be permitted to transfer academic credits earned with grades of D at other accredited institutions and apply them toward degree requirements in the Core Curriculum or lower division. Credits with the grade of D earned in upper division work will be transferred, and the department of the student's major will determine if those credits are acceptable toward a degree.

Academic credit allowed for work done in another institution within a given period of time may not exceed the normal amount of credit that could have been earned at this University during that time. Courses required at the senior college level should not be taken in junior colleges.

Applicants for advanced standing will not be given credit for more than 90 semester hours of academic credits of work done in other colleges to be applied toward a degree from Valdosta State University. Of those, only 60 semester hours may be Junior College Courses. Additionally, no degree credit will be given for work earned more than 30 years prior to admission to VSU.

Admission Of Transient Students

Transient admission is defined as admission for a limited period of time of students who are regularly enrolled in another institution and who ordinarily expect to return to that institution.

To be considered for transient admission to Valdosta State University, a student must be regularly enrolled in an accredited or approved institution and must have an academic record of a satisfactory or superior quality.

Students on scholastic probation, academic suspension, or disciplinary suspension may not be eligible for consideration.

Applicants for transient admission must supply the Director of Admissions a statement from the Registrar of the institution where they are regularly enrolled, which clearly sets forth their current status and recommends their acceptance.

Since the primary obligation of Valdosta State University is to its regularly enrolled students, it will consider accepting students applying for transient admission only when their admission will cause no hardship or inconvenience to either the University or its regularly enrolled student body. In any case, transient admission will be granted for only one academic semester. Students desiring to continue in the University beyond that point must apply for admission as transfer students and comply with transfer regulations.

Transcripts must be requested in writing and appropriate fees paid in order for copies of the academic record of transient students to be mailed to another institution.

Readmission to the University

Former students who have not been in attendance within the last calendar year and were in good standing at the time of their withdrawal or students who have attended another institution must apply to the Director of Admissions or to the Registrar for readmission.

Students seeking readmission following an academic suspension must also apply to the Director of Admissions or to the Registrar.

Admission of International Students

Valdosta State University encourages applications from international students. At Valdosta State University, international students are defined as citizens of countries other than the U.S., who require a visa in order to enter this country. To be considered for admission, international students must submit the following materials to the Office of International Programs, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA 31698:

1. A completed application for Admission form, with a check or money order for $10.00 in U.S. currency. A copy of the application form is included in the back of this catalogue; copies can also be obtained by writing directly to the Office of International Programs.

2. Official copies of all secondary school and college transcripts, as records of past academic work. These transcripts must be sent directly from the educational institutions to the Office of Admissions.

3. Proof of having completed ELS Language Centers' Level 109 or official results from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), if the applicant's first language is other than English. A minimum score of 500 on the TOEFL is required for admission.

4. A completed Certificate of Finances statement guaranteeing that the student will have a minimum of $14,500 (for nine months) available for personal and educational expenses. The Certificate of Finances statement form is available from the Office of Admissions.

5. Completed medical form. VSU requires that prior to registration all students present proof of two vaccines for measles and one for mumps and rubella. A doctor or nurse must verify these immunizations. New students must complete a VSU medical form which will be mailed to students after application for admission is submitted. In addition, all foreign students must purchase the VSU medical insurance plan for foreign students to cover the cost of medical treatment while in the U.S.

Once these materials are received, the Admissions Office will evaluate the international applicant's credentials and make an admissions decision. The applicant will be notified of the University's decision and, if admitted, will be issued an I-20 certificate of eligibility. This form must be taken to the nearest U.S. Embassy or consular office, which will issue a visa for entry to the United States.

Additional information on international student admissions at Valdosta State University is available from the Office of International Programs, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA 31698.

SPECIAL SERVICES PROGRAM

The Special Services Program is committed to assisting students to pursue educational goals to the fullest of their abilities. The program is responsible for coordination of services for students with disabilities. The primary objectives are to provide reasonable accommodations and ensure that campus programs and activities are accessible to disabled students. Some of the services available to meet individual needs of students include, but are not limited to, assistance with registration, alternative testing arrangements, text books on tapes, individual tutoring, instruction in learning strategies, access to technology, liaison with faculty, referral to other services, and diagnostic testing.

Eligibility for services can be established by students' providing current documentation of the disabling condition as defined under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. All the services are provided at no charge. For more information, contact the Special Services Program, Telephone 912-245-2498.

FINANCIAL AID ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS

In accordance with the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, students must be making satisfactory academic progress, both in quality and quantity, to qualify for and continue to receive Title IV federal financial aid. The satisfactory academic progress standards for federal financial aid recipients at Valdosta State University are as fol lows:

Undergraduate Students

Qualitative. All students are expected to maintain the academic standards outlined in the official Bulletin of Valdosta State University. Students who fail to meet these stan dards will be placed on academic suspension. Students receiving financial aid who are

placed on academic suspension will have their financial aid terminated. Financial aid applicants placed on academic suspension at the end of their last quarter of attendance are not eligible for financial aid.

Quantitative. In addition to maintaining the specified grade point average, students receiving financial aid must complete their degree in accordance with certain criteria and successfully complete a minimum percentage of credit hours each academic year.

At Valdosta State University, the maximum number of hours allowed is 150% of the number of semester hours required to earn the degree. Examples: Students pursu ing a degree which requires 120 semester hours may not receive financial aid after they have attempted 180 hours. If the degree requires 130 semester hours, students will be expected to have earned the degree after having attempted no more than 190 hours.

Students must successfully complete 67% of the courses for which they register in any academic year. The grades of A, B, C, D, and S count as the successful completion of a course. The grades of F, W, WF, I, IP, U, NR, and V do not count as the successful completion of a course.

Graduate Students

In addition to the quantitative standards required of undergraduates, graduate stu dents must maintain a cumulative grade point average of not less than 2.5 in order to be eligible for financial aid.

Remedial Course Work

No student may receive financial aid for more than 30 hours of remedial course work, which includes all College Preparatory Curriculum deficiencies, remedial courses, or developmental study courses..

Monitoring of Satisfactory Progress

Qualitative academic requirements will be checked at the end of each semester and at the time the student applies for financial aid. The limitation of total hours attempted and the 67% completion requirements will be checked at the end of the spring semester. The grade point average of students who apply during the academic year will be checked as of the last semester attended; the limitation on the total hours attempted and the 67% completion requirement will be checked at the end of the previous spring semester.

Summer Semester

Courses taken during the summer are counted exactly the same as courses taken during any other semester.

Transfer Students

Transfer students will be considered as incoming freshmen for the initial disburse ment of financial aid. Only grades earned at Valdosta State University will be used to determine the grade point average for financial aid eligibility. Hours transferred to Valdosta State University will be counted as total hours attempted at the end of the academic year.

Repeated Courses, Remedial Courses, Withdrawals, and Incompletes

Students should be careful in repeating courses, as all attempts at a course are counted in the maximum hours allowed to obtain a degree. Students are also reminded that withdrawing from a course does not count as successful completion and does not count in the required 67% completion rate each academic year. Incompletes also do not count as the successful completion of a course, and excessive incompletes can result in the termination of financial aid. Students can receive financial aid for no more than 30 hours of remedial course work (including remedial courses and courses to satisfy deficiencies in the College Preparatory Curriculum). However, students re quired to take remedial course work may have their eligibility extended by the number of remedial hours taken, up to a maximum of 30 hours.

Reinstatement of Aid

Reinstatement of Financial Aid depends upon availability of financial aid funds at the time of the application for reinstatement and other factors:

Students terminated from aid because of academic suspension or failure to com plete 67% of their courses in an academic year may apply for reinstatement of aid after they have completed 9 or more semester hours with a grade point average of at least 2.0, at their own expense, at Valdosta State University.

Students terminated from aid for failure to exit Developmental Studies within 30 semester hours may apply for a reinstatement of aid when they have exited Develop mental Studies.

Graduate students may request aid at any time their cumulative GPA reaches 2.5.

Appeals

Students wishing to appeal may do so by filling out a Satisfactory Progress Petition and presenting it to the Financial Aid Office, along with any supporting documenta tion. The Financial Aid Office staff may take into consideration illness, death in the immediate family, or any other extenuating circumstances. Students will be notified, in writing, of the decision.Students wishing to appeal the decision of the Financial Aid Office may do so by writing to the Student Financial Aid Committee.


PUBLIC SERVICES AND CONTINUING EDUCATION

Dr. Cuba McKay
Dean, Division of Public Services
and Continuing Education

The Office of Public Services, with offices in the Regional Center for Continuing Education, 903 North Patterson Street, administers a number of educational and educa tion-related programs which are presented on the main campus as well as other sites located throughout south Georgia. There are five major divisions in Public Services: Continuing Education, Off-Campus Credit Programs, Distance Education, Telecom munications, and the Evening Program.

The Continuing Education Division oversees professional development programs, leisure-type programs, and children's programs.

The Off-Campus Credit Division is responsible for assessing needs, requesting courses, and carrying out administrative duties involved with credit courses taught at off-campus sites.

The Distance Education Division is responsible for administrative duties involved with classes taught through two-way distance education technology. VSU is part of the Georgia Statewide Academic and Medical System (GSAMS), which is comprised of approximately 400 two-way distance learning sites throughout the state.

The Telecommunications Division is responsible for producing and transmitting programs via satellite with the VSU satellite uplink. VSU is one of three educational agencies in the state, along with GPTV and the University of Georgia, with satellite uplink capabilities.

The Evening Program Division aids students who are seeking degrees by attending classes on campus in the evening. Most of these students work during the day.

Public Services programs at Valdosta State are designed to aid residents of south Georgia in continuing their education and to assist adults in resolving problems en countered in their communities. Public Services personnel desire to learn of the needs and interests of area residents which can be met best by the university. Efforts are made to identify resources located in the institution and the community to develop educational programs and services to meet adult needs and interests.

Off-Campus Credit Program

The Office of Public Services administers Valdosta State University's off-campus programs. Each quarter courses are offered in Douglas, Thomasville, Tifton, Waycross, Bainbridge, and other areas as the need arises. In addition, selected undergraduate programs are offered at Moody Air Force Base, Marine Corps Logistics Base in Al

bany, and the Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay . By offering its courses at convenient off-campus locations, Valdosta State assists students in pursuing a college degree, al lows teachers to meet certification/recertification requirements, and offers students a means of enhancing their personal and professional development.

For information and assistance regarding Valdosta State University's off-campus programs, contact the Office of Public Services, Off-Campus Programs, located in the Regional Center for Continuing Education (912-245-3842). Information concerning programs offered at the Moody Air Force Base and the Albany Marine Corps Base may be obtained by calling the Valdosta State University office at Moody, (912-257-4163). Information concerning programs offered at the Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay may be obtained by calling the VSU office at Kings Bay (912-673-8524).

Distance Education

The Distance Education Program offers a variety of courses to off-campus loca tions using the advanced technology of two-way, interactive video. As part of the GSAMS network, VSU operates four classrooms on campus, four at community col leges (ABAC, Bainbridge, South Georgia, and Waycross), and one at Kings Bay Submarine Base. For information concerning classes available through this technol ogy, call 912-345-3842.

Telecommunications

Through the Telecommunications unit (satellite uplink) VSU produces and trans mits programs to satellite downlinks located in the state of Georgia and beyond Georgia's boundaries. This unit works very closely with GPTV to produce programs for the citizens of Georgia.

Continuing Education Non-Credit Courses

Varied continuing education programs are offered for persons in Valdosta and surrounding communities. The Professional Development Institute presents seminars and courses for persons in professions, business, and industry. Some courses are devel oped especially to meet the relicensing or recertification requirements of specific professional groups. Other Continuing Education activities include Elderhostel, Learn ing in Retirement, Children's Programs (including SCOPE, Kamp Kids, Fine Arts Academy, and swimming lessons), and Leisure Classes.

Continuing Education Unit (CEU) Recording and Reporting

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools requires the use of the CEU (Continuing Education Unit) by member institutions and provides this definition: "One continuing education unit is ten contact hours of participation in an organized, continu ing education experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction, and qualified instruction." The Office of Public Services administers the implementation of CEU procedures for the University. A permanent record of each participant's CEU credits is maintained, with transcripts available upon request.

Evening Program

Valdosta State University Evening Program assists adults in meeting their post -secondary educational needs and is designed specifically for adults who have never attended college or who have interrupted their education because of other commit ments. Each quarter, Valdosta State University offers a wide variety of evening credit courses leading to a degree. Students may take advantage of 19 different degree choices. Most of the courses are scheduled to begin at 6:00 p.m. and 8:30 p.m., on Mondays and Wednesdays, and on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Each applicant for the program is counseled by the Assistant Director of Public Services, who is responsible for the Evening Program. All degree programs are admin istered as integral parts of the University. Admission procedures are the same as those for regular, full-time day students. To register for classes, students must be admitted to the University. Former students who have not been in attendance within the last year and who were in good academic standing at the time of withdrawal are admitted after application to the Director of Admissions for readmission through the Evening Pro gram. Students who have never attended Valdosta State University must apply for admission. For assistance, call 912-245-3842.

Community Services

The physical and human resources of the University are available to assist groups in developing education-related programs and in working on the resolution of commu nity problems. Under certain conditions, facilities of the University may be used by civic organizations for programs. University personnel are available as resource per sons, consultants, public speakers, or group leaders to serve on community-oriented projects. Inquiries for community service assistance should be directed to the Director of Public Services.

Educational Institutes and Workshops

During the year, and particularly in summer months, educational institutes and workshops are organized by University personnel. Institutes and workshops are ori ented toward the working adult as a means of providing up-to-date information and techniques in specific areas of endeavor. University personnel welcome suggestions for possible institutes and workshops.

Educational Projects

The resources of the University are available to assist any public school system in south-central Georgia in identifying and resolving problems of the school system or in developing and conducting special studies. The University, through its well qualified faculty and administrators, is interested in working with public schools in the continu ing process of improving the quality of education.

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

Dr. Lloyd W. Benjamin

Vice President for Academic Affairs

The Bulletin is prepared for the convenience of faculty and students and is not to be construed as an official publication of the Board of Regents of the University Sys tem of Georgia. In case of any divergence from or conflict with the Bylaws or Policies of the Board of Regents, the official Bylaws and Policies of the Board of Regents shall prevail.

Academic operations are broadly supervised by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, who is in turn supported by the deans and directors of the several colleges and divisions. Department heads report to the appropriate dean or director of their college or division. The University consists of colleges and divisions with their respective departments as follows:

The College of Arts and Sciences: Departments of Biology; Chemistry; English; History; Mathematics and Computer Science; Modern and Classical Languages; Phi losophy; Physics, Astronomy, and Geosciences; Political Science; and Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice.

The College of Business Administration: Departments of Accounting and Finance, Management and Information Systems, and Marketing and Economics.

The College of Education: Departments of Vocational Education; Early Child hood and Reading Education; Middle Grades Education; Educational Leadership; Health, Physical Education, and Athletics; Psychology, Counseling and Guidance; Secondary Education; and Special Education and Communication Disorders

The College of the Arts: Departments of Art, Music, and Communication Arts.

The College of Nursing: Departments of Undergraduate Nursing and Graduate Nursing.

The Graduate School: All departments offering or participating in graduate pro grams.

The Division of Aerospace Studies.

HOW TO GET HELP

If you are just starting at VSU and need help, go to the office with the title that matches your needs: Office of Admissions (located at 1413 North Patterson Street), Office of the Registrar (in Nevins Hall), Department Head (of your major interest), Dean of the College (in which your major department is located), or Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs (1111 Nevins Hall). If you are undecided about your major, contact the Liberal Arts Studies Advising Office (2151 Nevins Hall).

If you have decided upon a major or general area of study, contact the Department Head of the appropriate discipline or the Dean of the College in which the department is located. The campus directory contains a list of departments, schools, colleges, ad ministrators, with office locations and telephone numbers. Department Heads and Deans are the appropriate individuals to contact for any academic problem at any time. All academic units report to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, whose office is in West Hall.

THE ACADEMIC YEAR

All curricula and courses at Valdosta State University are offered within the frame work of the semester system. Fall and winter semesters make up the traditional academic year, though students may pursue degree requirements on a year-round basis by attend ing the summer semester as well. Fall and winter semesters run for approximately 16 weeks each, including the examination period. The summer semester is often slightly reduced in length, with the length of class periods appropriately adjusted.

DEGREES AND MAJOR PROGRAMS

Valdosta State University awards the following undergraduate degrees: Associate of Arts, Associate of Applied Science, Bachelor of Applied Science, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of General Studies, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Health Fit ness, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Bachelor of Science in Education, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Business Administration, and Bachelor of Music. Graduate degrees awarded are Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of Public Administra tion, Master of Business Administration, Master of Accountancy, Master of Education, Master of Music Education, Master of Science in Nursing, Education Specialist, and Doctoral degrees in selected fields of education. Details regarding programs leading to graduate degrees may be found in the Graduate Bulletin.

The major program leading to the B.A.S. in Technical Studies is offered in Voca tional Education.

Major programs leading to the B.A. degree are offered in the following fields: Art, Criminal Justice, Economics, English, French, History, Legal Assistant Studies, Math ematics, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology/Anthropology, and Spanish.

Major programs leading to the B.S. degree are offered in the following fields: Applied Mathematics, Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Information Sys tems, Computer Science, Environmental Geography, Physics, Psychology, Administrative Services, and Sports Medicine.

Major programs leading to the B.S.Ed. degree are offered in the following fields: Business Education, Early Childhood Education, Middle Grades Education, Secondary Education (major teaching-subject concentration: Biology, English, French, History, Mathematics, Science, Social Science, and Spanish), Physical Education, Speech- Lan guage Pathology, Special Education; and Trade and Industrial Education.

Major programs leading to the B.B.A. degree are offered in Accounting, Econom ics, Finance, Management, and Marketing.

Major programs leading to the B.F.A. degree are offered in Art, Art Education, Speech Communication, and Theatre Arts.

The major program leading to the B.G.S. degree is offered in General Studies.

Major programs leading to the B.M. degree are offered in Music Performance (organ, piano, voice) and Music Education.

The B.S. in Health Fitness (Department of Health, Physical Education, and Athlet ics), and the B.S. in Nursing are professional rather than general B.S. degrees.

The Dual Degree Program with the Georgia Institute of Technology leads to a Bachelor's degree from VSU and a designated Bachelor's or Master's degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

The Valdosta State University-Valdosta Technical Institute Cooperative program leads to the A.A.S. degree.

A two-year Pre-Pharmacy program largely patterned after the requirement of the University of Georgia School of Pharmacy is offered in the Department of Biology. Through its broad range of major programs, the University also provides preparation for entry into professional schools of dentistry, medicine, applied medical sciences, law, theology, optometry, social work, etc.

The University offers courses in areas such as library science, geology, geography, linguistics, international/intercultural studies, journalism, religious studies, social ser vices, organizational communications, public relations, recreation, women's studies, African American studies, Japanese, Russian, and German, which do not have major programs at present.

Valdosta State University Georgia Institute

of Technology Dual Degree Program

Valdosta State University cooperates with the Georgia Institute of Technology in a dual degree program, wherein a student attends Valdosta State for approximately three years and Georgia Institute of Technology for approximately two years. Upon comple tion of certain academic requirements at each institution, the student is awarded a bachelor's degree from Valdosta State University and one of more than thirty desig nated degrees from the Georgia Institute of Technology in areas such as engineering, management, and sciences. In the case of highly qualified students, the Georgia Insti tute of Technology degree may be at the master's level. For more information, contact the Coordinator for Pre-Engineering.

PREPARATION FOR PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS

Preparation for Law School

Although law schools require a baccalaureate degree for admission, they do not always specify a particular undergraduate major or prescribe a specific pre-law pro gram. Literate, well-informed students with a broad general education tend to succeed in law school. Students aspiring to enter law school may major and minor in any of a number of fields which will aid them in attaining the following: (1) fluency in written and spoken English; (2) the ability to read difficult material with rapidity and compre

hension; (3) a solid background of American history and government; (4) a broad edu cation in social and cultural areas; (5) a fundamental understanding of business, including basic accounting procedures; and (6) the ability to reason logically.

Preparation for Medical, Dental, Veterinary Medicine, and other

Professional and Graduate Schools Offering Doctoral Degrees

Students should be aware that the vast majority of applicants now admitted to schools and programs in these categories hold the baccalaureate degree and will have established well above normal scores and averages in overall academic performance as well as on qualifying admission exams. Although students who apply for admission to professional schools may major in any area of study, most choose to major in biology, chemistry, or other natural sciences. Admission requirements may vary slightly from school to school, but all such programs require the basic undergraduate courses in biol ogy, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. Students majoring in other areas should consult the academic advisor, who may in turn wish to refer the student to the Biology or Chemistry Department for more specific information. Examples of paramedical pro fessional degrees include Podiatry, Chiropractic, Osteopathic Medicine, and Optometry. If an undergraduate degree is not required for entry into one of these fields, it is the responsibility of the student to provide the Academic Advisor with the requirements specified for admission to the school of the student's choice.

Preparation for Seminaries and Theological Schools

The bachelor's degree is required for admission to accredited theological schools and many seminaries. Students aspiring to enter such institutions should follow in their undergraduate work the general recommendations of the American Association of Theo logical Schools. Such a program provides students an opportunity to become acquainted with broad areas of subject matter. Advice on such programs is available from the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Second Baccalaureate Degree

A student may work for a second baccalaureate degree, and credits applied to wards the first degree will be permitted to meet the second degree requirements, where applicable and appropriate. Students must meet all requirements for the second degree in effect when work on the second degree is begun.

Office of International Programs

The Office of International Programs provides central coordination for the University's comprehensive range of services and activities in the area of international education. Campus-wide committees, open to all faculty and staff members, work with the Office of International Programs to achieve the following objectives:

1. Strengthen the international dimension of the curriculum by assuring that interna tional issues, problems, and perspectives are appropriately represented in courses, major degree programs, and minor studies;

2. Enrich the international dimension of the co-curricular climate by sponsoring in ternationally oriented lectures, artistic activities, seminars, and thematic events with an international focus;

3. Provide international experiences for students and faculty by initiating and spon soring study abroad programs and exchange agreements with foreign colleges and universities and by cooperating with external organizations and agencies that sup port teaching, study, and research activities abroad for faculty and students;

4. Encourage the involvement of international students and scholars in the life of the University through the provision of comprehensive support services for the inter national students and faculty and the promotion of Valdosta State as a welcoming environment for foreign scholars and students; and

5. Heighten global awareness and understanding in the region of south Georgia by bringing together resources of the University and community in educational and civic programs for the general pubic and maintaining strong linkages with other institutions in the region.

Among its many activities, the Office of International Programs administers an International Studies Minor, coordinates study abroad and exchange opportunities for faculty and students, oversees support services for international students, co-sponsors a Model United Nations Program, maintains a World-Wide Web home page, and orga nizes each spring a major lecture series on an international theme. More information on international activities of the university is available in the Office of International Programs, located in Carswell hall, 1526 North Oak Street.

Study Abroad Opportunities

Valdosta State University offers a variety of study abroad and exchange programs. Summer programs are offered directly by the University, with VSU faculty as group leaders and in cooperation with other institutions and organizations in providing group study abroad experiences. Students may also participate in exchange programs which allow them to attend overseas universities as regular students for a semester or an aca demic year. These bilateral exchange opportunities are currently available in Britain, Belize, Hungary, Japan, and Russia. VSU is also a member of the International Student Exchange Program, ISEP, through which students may choose from over 100 universi ties world-wide for study abroad experiences. When participating in an exchange, students typically pay VSU tuition, dormitory, and dining hall fees to cover instruction, room, and board at a host institution abroad.

Foreign Student Advisor

A full-time foreign student advisor provides support services to the international student community at Valdosta State University. This advisor, located in the Office of International Programs, Carswell Hall at 1526 North Oak Street, assists students in maintaining their immigration status, provides orientation to university and commu nity life, organizes special activities for international students, and offers cultural coun seling.

Aerospasce Studies for Men and Women (AFROTC)

The Division of Aerospace Studies was established to select and prepare students, through a permanent program of instruction, to serve as officers in the United States Air Force. The curriculum emphasizes the uniformly high level of military understand ing and knowledge required of all Air Force officers.

Aerospace Studies are offered to women as well as to men. The AFROTC training is divided into two parts. The first two years constitute the General Military Course; the last two the Professional Officer Course. The department offers a four-year and a two -year program. Each of these options leads to a commission in the Air Force. The four-year program requires completion of both the General Military Course and Professional Officer Course. Students with prior active military service or previous training at military schools may, on the basis of their experience, receive a waiver for portions of the Gen eral Military Course. Participation in High School ROTC and CAP training may also qualify students for waivers of portions of the General Military Course. The two-year program requires, as a substitute for the General Military Course, completion of a six -week Field Training Course at an Air Force base prior to formal enrollment in the Professional Officer Course. Junior college and other non-ROTC college transfer stu dents with no previous ROTC training, who qualify academically, are eligible for the two-year program.

Scholarships are available under the four-year program to outstanding students. Application for four-year scholarships must be made early in the senior year of high school. Qualified students in the first and second years of the AFROTC program may apply during the winter semester for a scholarship for their remaining years in the program. Scholarships pay tuition and fees, $100.00 per month tax-free subsistence, and cost of books. A Light Aircraft Training (LATR) program, which provides 21 hours of flight instruction, is available to each Air Force cadet who has been designated a pilot candidate and does not already possess a private pilot's license.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR UNDERGRADUATES

Candidates for degrees must complete a minimum of 120 (somewhat more in se lected majors) semester hours of academic work, with a grade point average of 2.00 or better calculated from all work attempted at Valdosta State University and other schools. No person will be graduated with less than a 2.00 average. The academic work must include a minimum of 40 hours of senior-college rank (that is, in courses numbered

3000 or above), including at least 20 semester hours of senior-college rank in the ma jor. A grade of C or better is required in major area courses and in the courses for the minor.

Of the 40 semester hours immediately preceding graduation, at least 30 must be taken in residence at Valdosta State University. Any student admitted to the University for the final year must be in residence for two semesters and must complete in this time at least 30 semester hours in residence, including 21 hours of senior college work in the major. If less than a normal load of academic work is carried, each 3-semester-hour course is counted as one-fifth of a semester.

No degree credit at Valdosta State University can be granted for work completed 30 years before the date of request for evaluation of credits for graduation. Credit for work in some programs older than six years in advance of an expected date of gradua tion may be invalidated.

Prospective graduating seniors must apply to the Office of the Registrar for final evaluation of credits and programs two full semesters in advance of the expected gradu ation date. A $25 graduation fee must be paid at the Office of Business and Finance prior to this final evaluation.

General Education

All programs which students may pursue at Valdosta State University are required to demonstrate, directly and indirectly, a basic concern for values associated with higher general education. All students are expected to share this concern throughout the Uni versity for enhancing and increasing the individual's level of personal civilization and refinement as a human being.

English Language Proficiency

All graduates of Valdosta State University are expected to exhibit reasonable ma turity and accuracy in speaking and writing the English language and a degree of skill in reading and interpretation commensurate with that of any representative graduate of a creditable American college. Evidence of serious incompetence in these skills may delay or prevent graduation from the University regardless of a student's major pro gram or special interests.

Credit by Departmental Examination

Students currently enrolled who present satisfactory evidence that they are quali fied in a particular subject may receive credit by an examination developed and administered by the appropriate instructional department. Satisfactory evidence may be, but is not limited to, work experience, non-credit courses, course work taken at non -accredited institutions, or military courses. Permission must be obtained from the head of the instructional department offering the course; however, exams will not be per mitted in courses for which a student has previously taken an examination for credit or was previously enrolled at Valdosta State University as a regular or audit student. It is suggested that students check with their advisor and the Registrar's Office prior to

requesting an examination for credit, to ensure that the credit will apply toward their graduation requirements. The course and credit will be entered on the student record card; however, the grade received will not calculate in the semester or cumulative grade point average.

Students must pay the Business and Finance Office, in advance of the examination, the current non-refundable fee for credit by examination. The student will show the receipt to the faculty member conducting the examination. The instructional depart ment is responsible for reporting the course number, title, credit hours, and fee receipt to the Registrar's Office for processing. Failing grades will be reported and posted to the student's record.

A total of 30 semester hours can be earned through any combination of CLEP, credit by departmental examination, correspondence courses, extension work and ad vanced placement.

Exemption Tests

Exemption tests which exempt a student from taking certain courses are conducted by some departments for placement purposes. Credit hours are not awarded for suc cessful completion of placement tests, and there is no fee required to take such a test.

Advanced Placement

Advanced placement is based on the assumption that some 12th grade students can do college freshman work, and that achievement, wherever done or whenever it occurs, should be recognized and rewarded. Valdosta State University provides the opportu nity for the qualified beginning student to obtain credit for certain basic courses. The granting of advanced placement is usually based on the College Entrance Examination Board Advanced Placement Test scores, as approved by departments of instruction. Students may contact the Admissions Office for more details and credit available. Scores of less than 3 will not be considered. The course and credit hours will be posted to the student's record card; however, the grade received will not calculate in the student's semester or cumulative grade point average.

INTERNSHIP GUIDELINES

Guidelines for Granting Academic Credit for Participation in Internship Programs

Students who take part in an internship program under any of the various intern ship courses offered at Valdosta State University derive benefits of a diverse nature from their participation. Some of the benefits inherent in an internship are of an aca demic nature, and even the non-academic benefits of practical experience may well justify participation in an internship program.

By awarding academic credit for enrollment in an internship program, VSU for mally recognizes the academic benefits of the program. The university grants semester hours of academic credit to students involved in internships, the number of hours de pending upon the specific departmental internship course in which the student enrolls.

The guidelines which follow have the purpose of allowing maximum flexibility within any given internship program and, at the same time, of requiring the careful thought and work by the participants that will make their internship experience aca demically significant.

I. Acceptable Programs. In order to receive academic credit for an internship program, students must be enrolled in an established internship course offered by an academic department of Valdosta State University.

II. Supervision. All interns will be assigned a faculty supervisor from the aca demic department in whose internship course they enroll. Supervisors will accept direct responsibility for each intern under their supervision. Faculty supervisors will carefully work out in advance all individual internship programs according to these general guide lines and college or departmental guidelines and shall specify academic requirements. The actual work experience supervision will be by the project directors of the various internship programs.

III. Academic Credit.

A. Each department that desires to offer internship opportunities will establish an internship course, with the approval of departmental faculty, appropriate executive committee(s), and the Academic Council, carrying credit of 3, 6, or 9 semester hours or variable credit up to 15 hours in increments of three hours.

B. Internship courses not required as part of the major will be counted as elective credit.

C. The number of credit hours to be granted for a particular internship experience will be determined in advance with the intern in keeping with the guidelines pertaining to credit hours as set forth below.

D. Academic credit will be granted on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

IV. Guidelines for Granting Academic Credit .

A. For academic credit of three semester hours, the internship will involve, at the minimum:

1. Work in an area related, although possibly indirectly, to the major field of study.

2. Fifteen (15) hours per week of activity.

3. A daily log of activities.

4. A report on the internship experience, relating it to the major field of study. The report will be made after completion of the internship.

B. For academic credit of six semester hours, the internship program will involve at the minimum:

1. Work in an area, although possibly indirectly related to the major field of study.

2. Twenty-five (25) hours per week of activity.

3. A daily log of activities.

4. A report on the internship experience, relating it to the major field of study. The report will be made after completion of the internship.

5. A research paper in an area appropriate to the major and bearing on some aspect of the internship program.

C. For academic credit of nine semester hours or more, the internship program will involve at the minimum:

1. Work in an area directly related to major field of study. The program should provide an opportunity for direct application of the knowledge gained in the classroom in the major field of study.

2. A daily log of activities.

3. Thirty-five (35) hours per week of activity.

4. A report on the internship experience, relating it to the major field of study. The report will be made after completion of the program.

5. A research paper or assessment in an area appropriate to the major and bearing on some aspect of the internship program.

COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP)

Valdosta State University students may receive college credit for certain courses based on scores on the College Level Examination Program (CLEP). Valdosta State University will accept up to 30 semester hours for subject examinations under the CLEP Program. The Office of Testing coordinates the administration dates for the examina tions of the program. The criteria for credit awarded for CLEP subject examinations are listed below. The only General Examination accepted is English Composition With Essay, and a minimum score of 500 is required.

Subject Examinations of the College Level Examination Program

CLEP Test Credit VSU Courses Score

American Government 3 hours Political Science 1101 50

American History I and II 6 History 2111 and 2112 46

Calculus With 3 Math 2261 40

Elementary Functions 6 Math 2261 and 2262 50

College Algebra 3 Math 1111 50

College Algebra - Trig 3 Math 1113 50

College Composition 3 English 1101 50+essay

6 English 1101 and 1102 60+essay

College French, I and II 3 French 1001 49

6 French 1001 and 1002 54

College German, I and II 3 German 1001 48

6 German 1001-1002 52

College Spanish, I and II 3 Spanish 1001 50

6 Spanish 1001-1002 55

General Biology 3 Biology 1010 and 1020L 49

General Psychology 3 Psychology 2500 50

Introductory Accounting 3 Accounting 2101 50

6 Accounting 2101-2102 60

Introductory

Macroeconomics 3 Economics 2105 50

Introductory

Microeconomics 3 Economics 2106 50

Introductory Sociology 3 Sociology 1101 50

Trigonometry 3 Mathematics 1112 50

Western Civilization I 3 History 1012 50

Western Civilization II 3 History 1013 50

UNIVERSITY SYSTEM REGENTS' TESTING PROGRAM

Each institution of the University System of Georgia must assure the other institu tions, and the System as a whole, that students obtaining a degree from that institution possess literacy competence, that is, certain minimum skills of reading and writing. Therefore students enrolled in undergraduate degree programs shall pass the Regents' Test as a requirement for graduation.

1. Students are expected to register for and take both components of the Regents' Test prior to the accumulation of 45 semester hours of earned credit. Students should not delay initial testing beyond having earned 44 hours of degree credit and may take and fail the test as many times as needed without remediation.

2. Students who have not taken the Regents' Test prior to the end of the quarter in which they will have accumulated 50 semester hours of earned credit are subject to denial of registration.

3. All students who have not passed the test, whether they have taken the test or not, by the time they earn 50 semester hours of degree credit must take the appropriate non-degree credit course or courses in remedial writing, RGTE 0199, and remedial reading, RGTR 0198, in each semester of attendance until they have passed all components of the test. These students must successfully pass the remedial course in reading and/or writing before they are allowed to take the reading and/or writing portion of the test again. Students who fail to enroll in the required remedial course will not be allowed to register at Valdosta State University.

4. Students transferring from within the University System of Georgia shall be sub ject to all provisions of this policy and to Valdosta State University procedures. Students transferring from outside the System with 40 or more earned semester hours shall register for and take the Regents' Test during the first semester of enrollment and in subsequent semesters shall be subject to all provisions of the policy and of VSU procedures.

5. Students must follow the same course registration procedure to register for both components of the Regents' Test and the remedial courses.

6. Foreign students on non-immigrant visas whose native language is not English may register for an alternative testing program. Students should register through the Foreign Student Advisor. Resident aliens, permanent residents, native speak ers of English, and U.S. citizens, regardless of native language, must pass the standard Regents's Test.

Review

The purpose of the review process is to provide a procedure for correcting errors in the rating of essays. It should be emphasized that because the Test is rated by three independent graders, few such errors occur.

1. A formal review of the essay component of the Regents' Test may be requested by the student when:

(a) there is a lack of rater unanimity on the essay component and

(b) the student has passed English 1101 and English 1102.

The request for review must be initiated by the mid-term of the first semester of enrollment following the semester in which the essay was failed, but in no case later than one calendar year from the quarter in which the failure occurred.

2. A formal review may be initiated through the Regents' Test Coordinator in Powell Hall. To determine whether there is adequate basis for a formal review, the Head of the Department of English or a designated faculty member (who will be an experienced rater) shall grade the essay. Students may schedule a conference with the Head of the Department of English if they wish to discuss their paper.

3. If, following this conference, there appear to exist reasonable questions concern ing the accuracy of the scoring of the essay, two additional VSU faculty members who are experienced essay graders shall review the essay.

4. If two of the three Valdosta State University graders rate the essay as passing, the essay is forwarded to the University System Central Office for formal review. If two of the three Valdosta State University graders rate the essay as failing, the review process is terminated without further recourse.

5. If the essay is forwarded to the Central Office for review, the student must be enrolled in RGTE 0199 during the appeal process.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES

Foreign Language Requirements at Valdosta State University

1. Entrance requirement

Students graduating from high school in the spring of 1988 or later must have completed a two-year sequence of the same foreign language in order to be accepted as a regularly enrolled student in any university or college of the University System of Georgia. Students who do not meet this requirement may be accepted on a provisional basis and will be required to take a three-hour course in a foreign language without degree credit before they have completed 30 semester hours. A grade of "C" or better is required to satisfy the entrance requirement.

2. Requirements for Major Programs

Throughout the various colleges of the University, majors in selected academic disciplines have established requirements in foreign language and culture to be com pleted as a part of their program of study. The following list indicates specific require ments, according to degrees and majors. The full listing of degree requirements should be consulted for each major.

Nine-hour foreign language requirement:

B.A. with a major in History, Mathematics, French, Spanish, Philosophy, Politi cal Science, Legal Assistant Studies, Sociology and Anthropology, Crimi nal Justice, Psychology, or Art

B.S. with a major in Biology, Chemistry, Astronomy, Environmental Geogra phy, or Physics

Six-hour foreign language requirement:

B.A. with a major in Economics or Music

B.S. with a major in Computer Science, Applied Mathematics, or Mathematics with Computer Science Option

B.M. with a major in Music Performance (Performance Track C, Voice)

Three-hour foreign language requirement:

B.S.Ed. with a major in Early Childhood Education

Foreign language requirement through MCL 2001:

B.S.Ed. with a major in Secondary Education/English

Foreign language requirement through MCL 2002:

B.A. with a major in English

MCL = any Modern or Classical Language (FREN, SPAN, GRMN, LATN, JAPN, RUSS)

3. Guidelines for Course Selection

Students should consult the following guidelines when selecting appropriate courses to complete the requirements for their major.

a. Students who elect to continue the study of their high school foreign language in order to meet requirements for the major may not take MCL 1001 in that language for credit. For review of MCL 1001 material and the completion of work equivalent to MCL 1002, they should take MCL 1111. Students who do not wish to review MCL 1001 content should take MCL 1002. To complete a six-hour requirement, they should take MCL 2001. And, MCL 2002 will complete the nine-hour requirement.

b. Students may elect to take a foreign language other than the one studied previ ously in high school. They should take MCL 1001, MCL 1002 (to complete the six -hour requirement), and MCL 2001 (to complete the nine-hour requirement).

c. MCL 1001, when taken to satisfy a deficiency in the University admissions requirements, will not be counted toward satisfying the foreign language requirement for the major. MCL 1002, 2001, and 2002 should be taken, if the same language is selected, to meet the foreign language requirement for the major. If students elect to begin the study of another language, MCL 1001, 1002, and 2001 should be taken.

State of Georgia Legislative Requirements

In accordance with an act of the General Assembly of the State of Georgia, all candidates for degree are required to possess and demonstrate a reasonable mastery of United States history, Georgia history, the United States Constitution, and the Georgia Constitution. These history requirements are met by the successful completion of His tory 2111 (3 hours) or History 2112 (3 hours). The constitution requirements are met by the successful completion of Political Science 1101 (3 hours) Transfer credit for

these three courses may not satisfy the requirements of the State of Georgia. An exemp tion test in Georgia History/Constitution is offered to transfer students whose American History/Political Science course did not include Georgia History/Constitution.

Health and Physical Education

There is no University-wide physical education requirement. However, certain degree programs, particularly teacher certification programs in education, include HSPE 2000 Health and Wellness for Life within the degree requirements. Review the degree requirements for your particular degree program.

All students are encouraged to include at least one development and one recre ational physical education course in their programs.

Junior and Senior College Work

Of the total credits required for a degree, a minimum of 60 semester hours must be earned in residence in senior (four-year) institutions. Required junior-college (lower division) courses are introductory in nature and are designed as prerequisites to senior -college (upper division) work. These include courses required by the University System Core Curriculum and are to be taken normally before a student achieves junior classifi cation.

Classification

Promotion from class to class (from freshman through senior) is based on hours earned in academic subjects. The semester hours required for different classifications are:

Class Semester Hours

Freshman 0-29

Sophomore 30-59

Junior 60-89

Senior 90 or more

Academic Load

Twelve or more semester hours constitute full-time enrollment for undergradu ates. The typical academic load for undergraduate students is approximately 15 hours per semester. An academic load of 19 hours is permitted without special approval. An academic load greater than 19 hours requires completion of the VSU Petition to Register for More Than Nineteen Hours, showing approvals of the academic advisor, the department head of the student's major, and the appropriate Dean or Director. The maximum load for which approval may be given is 21 semester hours credit.

Institutional credit is a unit of credit included in a student's total hours of academic load, which is the basis for fee calculations. Institutional credit does not apply towards the total number of hours required for graduation nor is it transferable to another insti tution.

Academic Advising

All students with a declared major will be advised by a faculty member from that major department. The advising folder will be maintained by that college or depart ment. Registration materials, including class schedule/fee assessment forms, will be sent to the major departments by the Registrar. All students who have not chosen a major are classified as Liberal Arts Students (LAS) through the LAS Advising Center in Nevins Hall. Students in the Associate of Arts program, Community College Pro gram, and Non-degree students will be assigned an advisor by the Dean of Arts and Sciences. Advising folders will be maintained by the dean, the LAS Advising Center, or the advising department. All registration and other academic materials will be given to the Dean of Arts and Sciences by the Registrar for distribution to the advising depart ments. All Learning Support students will be advised by an advisor in the Office of Student Academic Instructional Support (OASIS). Associate of Applied Science students will be advised by the College of Education, Department of Vocational Education.

Registration

Currently enrolled students may register for courses during the following registra tion periods:

Early Registration by telephone or PC held approximately six weeks before the term begins. Registration priority is based on student classification in the following order: Graduate students and seniors; juniors; sophomores; fresh men. Determine total charges via the telephone registration system after registering.

Regular Registration and drop/add by telephone or PC held immediately prior to the beginning of classes. Registration is held on a first come, first served basis. Fee- and course-schedules can be obtained at any computer lab or by phone.

Late Late Registration and continued drop/add held for approximately three-four days after the term begins. A late fee is assessed for registration during the Late Period.

New students are expected to register for classes during orientation programs held prior to the first day of classes. Off-campus course registration is coordinated by the Office of Public Services.

All undergraduate and graduate students must be advised before registration. Ad vising is mandatory. Students who have not been advised will not be able to access the registration system.

Registration in all courses offered by the University is under the direct supervision of the Registrar. Published schedules, policies and procedures for registration must be strictly observed. Registrations are canceled for students who do not complete the registration and fee payment process by the published deadlines.

For more information on fee payment procedures, see the section on Tuition, Fees, and Costs.

Withdrawal from Courses Policy

Students may withdraw from courses following the drop/add period until mid -term by obtaining the instructor's signature on the withdrawal form available from their major department. A withdrawal before mid-term is non-punitive, and a grade of "W" is assigned. Instructors may assign a "W" on the proof roll for students not attend ing class. However, it is the responsibility of the student to complete the withdrawal process. A withdrawal is not official until it is received and processed by the Office of the Registrar.

Students will not be allowed to withdraw after the mid-term point of the semester as published in the school calendar as required by Board of Regents' policy; however, students may petition an exception to the Board of Regents' withdrawal deadline for cases of hardship by completing a petition for withdrawal form available in the Office of the Registrar. The petition will become a permanent part of the student's file. The instructor may assign a grade of "W" or "WF" after mid-term. Note that "WF" is calculated in the grade point average the same as "F." Any student who discontinues class attendance after mid-term and does not officially withdraw may be assigned a grade of "F."

No fee adjustment will be made for withdrawals except as outlined in the Cost and Financial Aid Section of this bulletin. The Business and Finance Office will receive a copy of the withdrawal form for refunding if applicable. Refund checks are prepared the sixth week of the term.

Students receiving financial aid should be aware that withdrawal from courses may affect continued financial aid eligibility. Refer to the section on Financial Aid Academic Requirements for additional information.

Mid-term Grades

Mid-term grades will be submitted for all Freshman students. Grades will be mailed to Freshman students and will be available on the telephone information system. Stu dents in academic difficulty should contact their instructor and their advisor for guidance on what options may be available and recommended to the student for academic im provement.

Medical Withdrawals

A student may be administratively withdrawn from the university when, in the judgment of the Vice President for Student Affairs, the Director of the Counseling Center, and the University physician and after consultation with the student's parents and personal physician, if any, it is determined that the student suffers from a physical, mental, emotional, or psychological health condition which: (a) poses a significant danger or threat of physical harm to the student or to the person or property of others or (b) causes the student to interfere with the rights of other members of the university community or with the exercise of any proper activities or functions of the university or its personnel or (c) causes the student to be unable to meet institutional requirements for admission and continued enrollment, as defined in the Student Conduct Code and other publications of the university.

Except in emergency situations, the student shall, upon request, be accorded an appropriate hearing prior to final decision concerning continued enrollment.

No fee adjustment will be made for withdrawals except as outlined in the Cost and Financial Aid Section of this bulletin. The Business and Finance Office will receive a copy of the withdrawal form for refunding if applicable. Refund checks are prepared the fifth week of the term.

Change in Major Program

No change in a student's major program may be made during registration. Changes in major programs are made on the basis of careful consideration and planning with the advisor well before any registration period. Any change from one major program to another, especially if made late in the student's college career, may necessitate addi tional courses not required in the major program originally selected, plus additional semesters in residence. Both the accepting and releasing departments must approve a change of major program. Students who change their major or interrupt their college work for more than a year become subject to the requirements of the then current bul letin to fulfill degree requirements. Approved Change of Major forms must be submitted to the Registrar.

Course or Prerequisite Substitutions and Waivers

Requests for course substitutions or course waivers must contain specific justifica tion for the request and must be approved by the student's advisor, the head of the department and the dean of the school of the student's major, and the Registrar. If the substitution or waiver involves a Core Curriculum course, approval of the Vice Presi dent for Academic Affairs is also necessary. A "Request for Course Substitution/Waiver" form, available in the major's department, must be completed before approval is offi cial.

Requests for a prerequisite substitution or waiver must be approved by the instruc tor of the course requiring the prerequisite and by the administrator of that department or school. The department head and course instructor will be notified of all administra tively approved prerequisite substitutions or waivers.

Absence Regulations

The University expects that all students shall attend all regularly scheduled class meetings held for instruction or examination. Although independent study is encour aged at Valdosta State University, regular attendance at class is expected. Instructors are required to maintain records of class attendance. The unexcused absence or "cut" is not regarded as a student privilege.

It is recognized that class attendance is essentially a matter between students and their instructors. Instructors must explain their absence policy in the course. All stu dents are held responsible for knowing the specific attendance requirements as prescribed by their instructors and for the satisfactory make-up of work missed by absences. When students are compelled for any reason to be absent from class, they should immediately convey the reasons for the absence directly to the instructor.

A student who misses more then 20% of the scheduled classes of a course will be subject to receiving a failing grade in the course.

Absence problems which cannot be resolved between the instructor and student should be referred immediately to the department head responsible for the course. Dis continuance of class attendance without officially withdrawing from a course is sufficient cause for receiving a failing grade in the course. It is assumed that students will consult with their instructor in a given course before initiating procedures for withdrawing from that course. Students officially withdrawing from a course prior to midterm will receive a "W" for the course. After mid-term, it is the instructor who determines whether the grade awarded is "W" (withdrew passing) or "WF" (withdrew failing). The grade of "WF" is equivalent to an "F" and is calculated in the grade point average.

Off-campus activities, appropriately supervised and sponsored by faculty mem bers, which appear to justify a student's absence from scheduled classes, must be approved by the academic dean or director responsible for the activity. Such activities must be justifiable on grounds consistent with the educational program of the Univer sity as interpreted by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Instructors determine if a student is excused from class to participate in sanctioned activities, either off-campus or on-campus.

Auditing Classes

Students may be permitted to enroll as auditors in selected courses, provided regu lar enrollment in the course permits and if such an arrangement is completely agreeable to the instructor concerned. Fees for auditing classes are the same as for credit courses. Students are not permitted to change from audit to credit or from credit to audit after the last day for course changes as specified in the official calendar.

Final Examinations

Final examinations are regularly administered for all classes according to an estab lished schedule at the end of each term. The University Calendar is definite as to dates for final examinations, and permission for departure from the schedule cannot be granted.

Graduating seniors may not be required to take final examinations at the end of their final semester of residence, but only with the approval of the instructor concerned.

In all other cases, if an instructor considers that a final examination as such is not desirable or necessary in a particular course or considers it necessary for special rea sons to schedule a final examination at a time different from the regularly scheduled time, approval for such a departure from the established schedule must be obtained from the office of the dean or director of the college or division concerned.

Grading System

The semester hour is the basic unit of work, in which each course offered has credit value in terms of a certain number of semester hours normally conforming to the number of contact class hours per week. For example, courses meeting three hours a week normally carry three semester hours of credit. A typical exception occurs in laboratory work, in which two or three hours of class contact have a one-credit-hour value.

Grades and quality points represent the instructor's final estimate of the student's performance in a course. All grades assigned remain on the student's permanent record and transcript. The following letters denote grades which are included in the computa tion of the grade-point average:

A = Excellent: 4 quality points per hour D = Passing: 1 quality point per hour

B = Good: 3 quality points per hour WF = Withdrew failing: 0 quality points

C = Satisfactory: 2 quality points per hour F = Failure: 0 quality points

The following letters denote cases in which the grade is not included in the computa tion of the grade point average:

I = Incomplete

IP = In progress (course scheduled for more than one quarter)

K = Credit by examination

NR = Not reported by instructor or course ending date is after the scheduled end of the quarter

S = Satisfactory

U = Unsatisfactory

V = Audit

W = Withdrew, without penalty

A cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of at least 2.00 (i.e., an average of at least "C" in all work attempted is required for graduation from VSU. Grades for credit accepted in transfer or by examination are posted on a student's permanent record card but are not included in the calculation of the VSU cumulative grade-point average.

The cumulative grade-point average will be calculated by dividing the number of hours scheduled in all courses attempted in which a grade of A, B, C, D, F, or WF has been assigned into the number of quality points earned on those hours scheduled.

Computation of the cumulative grade-point average treats WF and F grades identically. Grades of W, NR, S, V, U, K, IP, and I are not computed.

Courses passed with a grade of D cannot be counted as satisfying the requirements for the major or a minor subject.

The repeat rule was discontinued Summer 1989. Cumulative grade-point averages calculated prior to that time continue to include the repeat provisions. Academic records that were not adjusted for courses repeated prior to Summer 1989 will not be altered.

A report of I (incomplete) at the end of any course represents failure to complete some requirement of the course. A report of I requires the subsequent completion of all requirements in the course involved by the mid-term point of the immediately succeed ing semester regardless of enrollment status. Students have the responsibility to arrange with their instructor for completion of course requirements in accordance with this regulation. An Incomplete in a graduate course must be removed within one calendar year. NR is assigned when an instructor fails to submit final grades by the established deadline or when the course ending date is after the schedule end of the semester. The Incomplete or NR grade will remain on the student's permanent record and transcript. An Incomplete will be changed to an F or WF if not removed by the required period of time indicated above.

Grade Changes

Final grades submitted by the course instructor may not be changed except for approved special circumstances. A request for grade change form must be submitted by the instructor, and the instructor must enter the change in the final grade book main tained by the Registrar.

Grade Appeals

Students who have just cause to appeal the assignment of a grade must first discuss the problem with their professor. Further appeals are then directed, in order, to the professor's Department Head and Dean, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and the President.

ACADEMIC RENEWAL POLICY

The Academic Renewal Policy allows Valdosta State University degree-seeking undergraduate students who have experienced academic difficulty to have one oppor tunity to make a fresh start at Valdosta State University after an absence of five consecutive calendar years from any postsecondary institution.

Former Developmental Studies students may apply for Academic Renewal only if they successfully completed all Developmental Studies requirements before the com mencement of the five-year period of absence.

All previously attempted coursework continues to be recorded on the student's official transcript. A complete statement of the policy and the form, Application of Academic Renewal, are available in the Office of the Registrar.

Course Numbering

Numbers

0-0999 Remedial Courses. Such courses do not carry credit toward graduation.

1000-2999 Lower Division Undergraduate Courses. Courses with these numbers are basic undergraduate courses.

3000-4999 Upper Division Undergraduate Courses. Courses with these numbers are for advanced undergraduate courses. Some schools or divisions may require junior class standing as a prerequisite for these courses.

5000-6999 Mixed Graduate/Upper Division Courses. Some courses numbered 30003999 are open to graduate students; such courses carry dual numbers, with the graduate version of the course numbered between 5000 and 5999. Similarly, courses numbered 4000-4999 may be taken by graduate students using a corresponding number in the range 60006999.

7000-9999 Graduate Courses. Enrollment in these courses is restricted to graduate students.

Certain courses require prerequisites (other courses that must be taken before a given course), and/or corequisites (other courses that must be taken during the same term as a given course), or the consent of the instructor or of the Department Head. Students are advised to be sure they have met these requirements.

Cross-disciplinary Courses

Certain courses, because of their scope and focus, are identified by different desig nations, that is, cross-listed. Students may decide which designation they wish to register for, depending on their needs, but such a dual-listed or cross-listed course can count only once and cannot be taken a second time for credit under a different designation. Cross-disciplinary courses are clearly identified in the descriptions of the "Courses of Instruction" section as "Also offered as ...."

RECOGNITION OF UNDERGRADUATE SUPERIOR ACHIEVEMENT

Graduation With Honors

Three levels of graduation honors recognize exceptional students qualifying for the Bachelor's degree. These honors are based upon all academic work attempted, includ ing all courses attempted at other institutions. A minimum of 60 semester hours of academic work, including any student teaching, must be successfully completed in residence at Valdosta State University. Credit by examination or exemption will not be included in the work considered for residence.

Cum Laude for an overall grade-point average of 3.50 and a VSU cumulative

average of 3.50.

Magna Cum Laude for an overall grade-point average of 3.75 and a VSU

cumulative average of 3.75.

Summa Cum Laude for an overall grade-point average of 4.00 and a VSU

cumulative average of 4.00.

Honors shown in the graduation program are based on grades earned to date; how ever, official honors included on diplomas include all work attempted at VSU and all other institutions, including accepted and non-accepted transfer credit.

Dean's List

Students achieving a semester GPA of 3.66 or higher on 10 or more semester hours with a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or higher are recognized by being placed on the Dean's List. Neither incomplete grades (I) nor the final grades and hours when the incomplete is removed are included in the Dean's List calculation.

Students achieving Dean's List standing at the end of any quarter may register for 20 hours of academic subjects in the following semester . Developmental Studies, tran sients, and graduate students are not eligible for Dean's List status.

University Honors Program

The Honors Program offers interdisciplinary seminars, a special track of core cur riculum courses, and opportunities for independent research that lead to a Certificate in University Honors. The program is designed to provide for the stimulation and chal lenge of academically motivated students so that they achieve their full academic potential, while at the same time providing recognition for such students' endeavors. The Honors Program encourages connections between disciplines, interdisciplinary programs, innovative and unusual approaches to subject matter, and a reliance upon experiential learning that is fully integrated into the course content. The courses and seminars are designed to give all students in the Honors Program a shared intellectual experience in order to develop a community of learners and to encourage a spirit of collegiality in the pursuit of knowledge, a spirit that is essential for intellectual growth and personal fulfillment. Offerings include:

1. Limited-enrollment classes in anthropology, art, biology, chemistry, economics, health, history, literature and languages, mathematics, philosophy, political sci ence, psychology, and sociology. All of these courses satisfy core curriculum requirements, depending on the student's major.

2. Special honor seminars with an interdisciplinary focus. These explore a wide range of interesting, controversial, and timely issues. These seminars can satisfy elective credit in a variety of major degree programs.

3. Honors Fora, a series of discussions and lectures led by faculty, visiting scholars, and distinguished members of the community.

The University Honors Program also sponsors the Honors Student Association, open to all students with a grade point average of 3.0. The Honors Program is affiliated with the National Collegiate Honors Council, the Southern Regional Honors Council, and the Georgia Honors Council. These affiliations afford wide opportunity for travel to academic conventions and conferences. Application forms and additional informa tion about the Honors Program can be found in West Hall 120 (Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences) and at the VSU Honors House, 2 Brookwood Circle.

ACADEMIC PROBATION, AND SUSPENSION

Valdosta State University seeks to provide an environment suitable for promoting the systematic pursuit of learning. To ensure this primary goal, the University requires of its students reasonable academic progress. The retention of those students who re peatedly demonstrate a lack of ability, industry, maturity, and preparation would be inconsistent with this requirement.

Academic probation serves as the initial notice that the student's performance is not currently meeting the minimum grade point average required for graduation. Con tinued performance at this level will result in the student's being placed on academic probation. Academic probation is designed to serve three purposes: (1) to make clear to

all concerned the inadequacy of a student's performance; (2) to provide occasion for necessary counseling; and (3) to give students whose success is in doubt additional opportunity to demonstrate performance.

Academic suspension is imposed as a strong indication that the student incurring such suspension should withdraw from the University, at least for a time, to reconsider the appropriateness of a college career or to make necessary fundamental adjustments in attitudes toward the academic demands of college.

I. Stages of Progress with Minimum Grade Point Averages Required

An individual's stage of progress is determined on the basis of the number of aca demic semester hours attempted, including those transferred from other institutions. Transfer credits are not included in computing grade-point averages.

Semester Hours attempted at VSU Cumulative grade-point

and hours transferred to VSU average required on VSU courses

1 - 29 1.60

30 -59 1.75

60 - 89 1.90

90 - graduation 2.00

II. Academic Probation

A student will be placed on academic probation if, at the end of any semester while the student is in good standing, the cumulative GPA falls below the minimum specified in the table above or the semester GPA falls below 2.00. Even though a student on probation is making some progress toward graduation, it should be clearly understood that without immediate academic improvement, suspension may result.

III. Academic Suspension

a. A student will be suspended if at the end of any term, while on academic probation, the cumulative GPA falls below the minimum specified in the table above, and the term GPA falls below 2.00.

b. A first suspension will be for one semester. (See readmission procedures below.)

c. A second suspension shall be for two academic semesters.

d. A third or subsequent suspension shall be for one calendar year.

e. Should another institution permit a student on suspension from Valdosta State University to enroll, work taken at that institution during any period of suspension shall not be counted as degree credit at Valdosta State University unless prior ap proval was obtained from the student's Dean at Valdosta State University.

f. Any Valdosta State University students on academic suspension may enroll during any summer term at VSU; however, they must schedule and complete two 3-hour courses with a minimum GPA of 2.0 to lift suspension.

IV. Right of Appeal

Upon appeal by the student, the dean or director of the respective academic unit in which the student is enrolled has the authority to waive the first or second suspension if unusual circumstances warrant. The third suspension can be appealed only by petition to the Admissions Advisory Committee.

V. Readmission Procedures

Students must make application for readmission in writing to the Director of Ad missions prior to registration for the semester in which they plan to return. Following the first or second suspension, readmission on probation may be granted for unusual and compelling reasons by the dean or director of the college or division in which the student was enrolled at the time of suspension. A suspended student readmitted on probation may have specific academic requirements imposed by the Admissions Advi sory Committee or by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. A petition to the Committee and personal appearance before the Committee are required. Any further appeals must be made by petition directly to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. A student accepted for readmission, suspended at the end of the last term of attendance, who does not re-enroll will remain on academic suspension.

WORK BY CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION

Not more than 30 semester hours of undergraduate work may be earned by exten sion and credit by examination, of which not more than 17 semester hours may be by correspondence. Under no circumstances will students in the final year of residence (30 semester hours) be permitted to take more than 7 semester hours by correspondence or extension. Students in residence may not enroll for correspondence or extension work except on permission of the appropriate dean or director. No course which a student may have failed while in residence at Valdosta State University may be taken by corre spondence or extension for degree credit. The Student Affairs Office coordinates correspondence study. Credit from University of Georgia Extension Centers will be restricted to lower division (1000 and 2000 level) in addition to the 30-hour limitation.

STUDENT RECORDS

The Office of the Registrar maintains the academic records of students and issues transcripts of records and certificates for various governmental agencies.

Students are encouraged to check with the Registrar's Office when questions arise concerning academic status. All students have a permanent record to which only they and authorized personnel have access, and it is to the student's advantage to check this record periodically. Official transcripts are provided upon written request of the stu dent. All undergraduate and graduate work constitutes a complete academic record. Portions of that record will not be deleted when transcripts are provided. All grades assigned remain on the student's permanent record and transcript. Two weeks' pro cessing time should be allowed for the preparation of transcripts and certifications.

Transcripts of academic records from other colleges and high schools are not pro vided. The student must contact previous institutions attended for those transcripts. It is also the student's responsibility to contact testing agencies for test score reports. Students must request copies of other academic records through the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.

TRANSCRIPT POLICY

A transcript is an official copy of the official permanent academic record main tained by the Registrar. Recorded on the permanent academic record are all VSU courses attempted, all grades assigned, degrees received, and a summary of transfer hours ac cepted with VSU equivalent course numbers indicated. Official transcripts and certifications of student academic records are issued by the Office of the Registrar for all students of the University. Copies of high school records and transfer transcripts from other schools must be requested from the institutions where the course work was taken.

Transcripts may be requested in writing, either in person or by mail. (See Tran script Fees, in the section on Tuition, Costs, and Fees.) Normally, transcripts will be mailed within one week of the request unless the request is delayed because of a "hold" on the record or delayed for posting of a grade change, an earned degree, or current semester grades. Requests are processed in the order they are received. Students re quiring priority service may pay a special processing fee.

All transcripts must be requested by the individual student, including transient students desiring transfer credit at another institution. No partial or incomplete tran scripts including only certain courses or grades are issued. Transcripts will not be released unless the student has satisfied all financial and other obligations.

VSU is permitted, but not required, to disclose to parents of a student information contained in the education records of the student if the parents notify VSU in writing that the student is a dependent as defined in Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954.

The Valdosta State University records offices (Registrar, Admissions, Graduate Studies) will accept "faxed" records as working documents pending the receipt of offi cial, authenticated confirming documents.

The University will accept a request for student records (transcripts) by facsimile transmission equipment. Facsimile requests for copies of student records must be signed by the student whose record is to be reproduced.

Valdosta State University will not provide official copies of student records by facsimile transmission.

Transcript policies apply as well to all certification forms and letters.

DIPLOMA REPLACEMENT

Valdosta State University will provide replacement diplomas for graduates whose diplomas have been damaged or lost. The cost of this service will be the current di ploma replacement fee charged by the university.

Valdosta State University mails diplomas to graduates. The institution will replace lost or damaged diplomas, without cost to the student, when such loss or damage oc

curs during that mailing. The student must return damaged diplomas or documentation from the United States Post Office that the diploma cannot be located. A period of twelve to fifteen weeks is required for the printer to process all special replacement orders.

Diplomas will not be reissued when graduates change their name from that offi cially recorded at the time when degree requirements were met.

ENROLLING AT ANOTHER INSTITUTION AS A TRANSIENT STUDENT

A regularly-enrolled undergraduate student wishing to attend another institution for one term, with the intention of returning to Valdosta State University, will be con sidered a "transient" student at the other school. The following procedure must be followed to obtain "transient" status:

1. A transient request form must be obtained from the student's major department or the Registrar's Office.

2. The form must be completed by the student's advisor, who must approve specific courses to be taken as a transient student. (The Regents' Testing Coordinator at Valdosta State must approve Regents' testing at another institution.)

3. The form must be taken to the Admissions Office for evaluation of proposed tran sient courses.

4. The form must be signed by the head of the department.

5. All holds (such as traffic fines, library fines, etc.) must be cleared with the appro priate office before a transient request can be processed.

6. The completed transient request form should be returned to the Registrar's Office for processing.

7. Students should contact the school they are planning to attend to inquire about admission requirements.

8. Students must request an official transcript from the other institution for transfer credit evaluation by the VSU Admissions Office.

Credit will not be accepted and posted to the Valdosta State University record until an official transcript has been received from the other institution, and all transfer credit requirements have been met as specified in the current VSU Bulletin. Credit accepted in transfer will not be calculated into the student's Valdosta State University grade point average. Credit is not acceptable in transfer for students who are on academic suspension at Valdosta State University without their VSU Dean's prior approval. Valdosta State University accepts a maximum of 60 transfer semesters hours from a junior college and a maximum of 90 total semester hours in transfer. In addition, a grade of "C" (average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale) is required for course credit to be accepted in transfer. Students who have not attended Valdosta State University for over one year must apply for readmission and must satisfy degree requirements as specified in the VSU Bulletin current at the time of application.


COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Dr. Floyd D. Toth, Dean

From its beginnings as a two-year women's normal school to its current role as a regional university, Valdosta State University has taken an active part in the prepara tion of teachers for Georgia's schools. As the role of teacher has changed over these years, so have the educational programs offered by the College of Education. Today's programs focus on developing professionals for schools by incorporating standards from the appropriate accrediting bodies. These standards describe what beginning teach ers should know and be able to do upon completion of their studies. Most programs in the College of Education require extensive field experiences, in which preservice teachers apply the content, methods, and skills learned in college course work and receive feed back from mentor teachers and college supervisors. Prior to graduation, all students must demonstrate competencies necessary for beginning teachers in their chosen field of study.

Accreditation

Teacher preparation programs at Valdosta State University meet Georgia certifi cation requirements of the Professional Standards Commission and are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

Teaching Degree Programs in the College of Education

Major/Teaching Field Level Major/Teaching Field Level

Early Childhood Education P-5 Business Education 7-12

Middle Grades Education 4-8 Music Education P-12

Secondary Education: 7-12 Physical Education P-12

English, Mathematics, Special Education: P-12

Science Social Science Communication Disorders

Foreign Language Education: P-12 Technical, Trade, and 7-12

French, Spanish Industrial Education

Art Education P-12

Admission to the Teacher Education Program

All undergraduate students seeking a degree from a teaching field program are required to apply for Admission to Teacher Education prior to taking senior college (3000 and 4000 level) courses. Applications are available in the Dean's Office, Col lege of Education, and should be submitted when the student has accumulated 45 semester hours towards an education degree program.

The requirements for admission into Teacher Education are:

1. have a major leading to teacher certification;

2. have earned at least 45 semester hours towards an education degree;

3. have achieved at least a 2.50 Grade Point Average on all coursework. Note that majors in Communication Disorders must have a 3.0 GPA. All trans fer credits are included in the GPA calculation;

4. have passed both parts of the Regents' Testing Program;

5. have passed the Reading, Writing, and Mathematics portions of the Pre -Professional Skills Test (PPST) or the computer version, CBT, or exempted this requirement with appropriate scores on the SAT, ACT or GRE;

6. a grade of "C" or better in CIED 2000, ENGL 1101, and ENGL 1102;

7. not have a criminal background, a dishonorable discharge from the Armed Services, not have been discharged from any position for unprofessional conduct, or not have any record that indicates behaviors not compatible with those expected of a professional educator in Georgia. Any pending investigations similar to these items must be resolved before admission to Teacher Education;

8. have professional liability insurance;

9. attended orientation to Teacher Education meeting.

Admission to Teacher Education is a prerequisite for all senior-college level courses in the program of study. Students not meeting the criteria are informed of their defi ciencies and not allowed to take 3000-level or 4000-level courses until the deficiencies are removed. The Grade Point Average for admission to Teacher Education is calcu lated using all coursework taken within the past five years, including transfer credits. All grades and hours for courses that are repeated will be included in this calculation there is no "forgiveness" policy. If extenuating circumstances have led to denial of admission to Teacher Education, students may appeal to the Undergraduate Policies Committee. On registration day each semester, the Committee meets individually with all students submitting appeals. Appeal forms are available in the Dean's Office in the College of Education.

Transfer students enrolling in the College of Education with a Grade Point Aver age below 2.50 will not be allowed to take senior-college level courses in their programs of study until they are admitted to Teacher Education.

Special Admission Requirements in Certain Programs

To be admitted to the major program in Health Fitness, students must have a Grade Point Average of at least 2.5.

To be admitted to the major program in Communication Disorders, students must have a GPA of at least 3.0.

Advising Center

The Advising Center in the College of Education was created specifically to help new students and transfer students who have not been admitted to Teacher Education. The Center assists students in planning their program of study and provides a strong support system for addressing individual concerns. College faculty members with ex cellent advising skills are selected from each department to assist students in the Advising Center. Also, students who have been successful at VSU are recruited as peer advisors to provide additional assistance to students in their critical first years at the university.

Promoting Diversity in Teacher Education

The College of Education establishes an environment that is accepting of differing life experiences and cultures and encourages the successful participation of any under -represented groups. Any student who is denied admission to Teacher Education may appeal for an exception. The Undergraduate Policies Committee will review each ap peal and determine if the student's background or other circumstances created a barrier for entering Teacher Education. The Committee will grant exceptions to students who demonstrate potential for success, in order to promote diversity in the College of Edu cation.

Retention in Teacher Education Programs

Education majors are required to earn minimum grades of "C" in all professional education courses and those courses related to the major. Student progress will be monitored through (a) GPA, (b) observations, and (c) faculty and public school teach ers' recommendations.

With each field-based course, students will be evaluated on their interactions in the public school environment. Faculty members responsible for the course will report any concerns to the student's advisor and discuss the concerns with the student and depart ment head. Repeated concerns in field experiences can jeopardize students' progress in completing their programs of study.

Professional Laboratory Experiences

Valdosta State University's teacher preparation program places a heavy emphasis upon professional laboratory experiences. The experiences are of the types indicated below.

Students who participate in field-based experiences are required to be covered by professional liability insurance. One inexpensive way to meet this requirement is through professional association student membership. Membership is not required, but non -members must present evidence of liability coverage before participating in any type of field experience.

Observation and Participation

Certain professional courses require students to observe and participate in activi ties with children and youth, usually these activities are carried out in the public schools of Valdosta and Lowndes County.

Opening School Experience

The required Opening School Experience is completed in approved public school settings, where the student participates in the teachers' pre-planning period and through the first two days of classes. The Opening School Experience is done during the senior year. This activity pairs the student with a mentor teacher to learn about the organiza tion and planning needed to begin a new school year. Applications for this experience are available in the Dean's Office in the College of Education or at the Teacher Educa tion web site and are due during the first three weeks of the spring term prior to the anticipated Opening School Experience.

Student Teaching

Student teaching is the culminating professional experience and is scheduled dur ing the last term of university enrollment. Students must have a GPA. of 2.50 or higher in their upper division coursework to enroll in student teaching. All course work must be completed prior to student teaching. Since it is a full-time activity (10 semester hours), students are not permitted to take coursework concurrently with student teach ing. Applications must be submitted to the Assistant Dean of Education for Student Services. Applications for fall semester student teaching are due within the first two weeks of the preceding spring semester. Applications for spring semester student teaching are due within the first two weeks of the preceding fall semester. Student teaching is not offered in the summer.

All students applying for the student teaching experience must complete a consent form, giving VSU permission to conduct a criminal background check. The consent form and the fee to cover the costs must be included with the student teaching applica tion. The background check will be completed prior to student teachers' being placed in the schools.

Seminar for student teachers is a two credit hour course taken concurrently with student teaching. Dates and times for the seminar meetings will be provided at the student teaching orientation and on the Teacher Education web site.

Student Education Association

Education majors are encouraged to become active members of the Student Edu cation Association. Students may join the Student Georgia Association of Educators and the Student National Education Association or the Professional Association of Georgia Educators. These organizations form the Student Education Association of Valdosta State University.

GRADUATION AND TEACHER CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

Health and Physical Education

A College of Education requirement is that all persons preparing to teach must satisfactorily complete courses in health and physical education. This requirement is met by taking HSPE 2000 (2 hours), two physical education activities courses, and the first aid/CPR course, HSPE 2150.

Course in Education of Exceptional Children

An act of the Georgia Legislature (HB 671) requires that all teachers, principals, and guidance counselors must satisfactorily complete training in the identification and education of exceptional children. The SPEC 3010 course at Valdosta State University has been approved to meet this requirement.

Georgia Teacher Certification Testing Program

The Georgia Professional Standards Commission requires applicants seeking ini tial certification to demonstrate proficiency in their certification area by passing the tests appropriate to their program of study. The test series is the PRAXIS II Subject Assessments. Registration applications are available in the office of the Dean of the College of Education and at the Praxis web site, www.ets.org/praxis. A passing score must be obtained on these certification tests before the College of Education will rec ommend students for an initial Georgia certificate.

The certification tests are given periodically during the school year at VSU and in other locations across the state. Students are encouraged to register for their respective tests during the first semester of the senior year. Those who fail to attain passing scores on the first attempt may register for and repeat the tests until passing scores are earned.

Certification Programs

Students coming to Valdosta State University to obtain a teaching certificate should contact the department that offers the degree program in the certification field of inter

est. If the students qualify for Teacher Education, then their transcripts will be re viewed and an individualized certification program developed. Students applying for a certification program must have a 2.5 GPA and have passed or exempted all three parts of the Praxis I test. The PRAXIS II Subject Assessments Test is required in each certi fication area that has a test for that specific teaching field.

Other Degree Programs in the College of Education

Major Department Degrees

Psychology Psychology B.A., B.S.

Sports Medicine Health, Physical Education. B.S.

Health Fitness and Athletics B.S.H.F.

Administrative Services Vocational Education B.S.

Technical Studies B.A.S.

Cooperative Program with A.A.S.

Technical Institutes

Dental Hygiene - Cooperative A.A.S.

Program with Valdosta

Technical Institute

Course Designations within the College of Education

ARED Art Education

BVED Business and Vocational Education

CIED Curriculum and Instruction

COMD Communication Disorders

ECED Early Childhood Education

FLED Foreign Language Education

ITED Instructional Technology

HSPE Health Education, Health Fitness, Physical Education

LEAD Educational Leadership

MGED Middle Grades Education

MUE Music Education

PSYC Psychology, Counseling and Guidance

READ Reading Education

RSCH Educational Research

SEED Secondary Education

SPEC Special Education

VOED Vocational Education

DEPARTMENT OF EARLY CHILDHOOD

AND READING EDUCATION

Dr. Brenda P. Dixey, Head

Room 164, Education Center

The Department of Early Childhood and Reading Education is a multidiciplinary department with programs that lead to a B.S.Ed. degree in Early Childhood Education, a M.Ed. degree in Early Childhood Education (P-3 Option and Content Option), a M.Ed. degree in Reading Education, an Ed.S. in Early Childhood Education, and an Ed.S. in Reading Education.

The Early Childhood Education programs are designed to prepare professional educators who manifest the knowledge, dispositions, and competencies deemed neces sary to enhance young children's overall intellectual, social, emotional, and personal growth and development. The design of the undergraduate professional program in cludes a variety of methods and content courses. These courses are supported by structured field experiences designed to provide opportunities to meld theory with prac tice in field-based interactions with young children. The Reading Education programs prepare individuals who specialize in the areas of reading/language arts. Graduate programs are designed to build upon prior professional preparation and experiences and extend the depth and breath of knowledge of the theoretical base and exemplary practices in early childhood education and reading education.

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree with a

Major in Early Childhood Education

The undergraduate Early Childhood Education program has numerous desired out comes. Examples of these outcomes for the undergraduate program in Early Childhood Education include the following:

Selected Educational Outcomes

1. Graduates will demonstrate an acceptable level of content knowledge.

2. Graduates will demonstrate an acceptable level of teaching competency for an extended period of time during the student teaching experience by plan ning, delivering, and assessing appropriate instruction for pupils who represent a diverse population and who are in public school settings.

3. Graduates will integrate technology into instruction, assessment, and com munication.

4. Graduates will demonstrate characteristics of reflective practitioners by evalu ating the effects of choices and actions on others (pupils, families, and other professionals in the learning community).

Requirements for the B.S.Ed. Degree with a

Major in Early Childhood Education

Core Areas A-E (See VSU Core Curriculum, pp. 95-98) 42 hours

Area F Requirements 18 hours

BVED 2400, CIED 2000, PSYC 2700 9 hours

One course from each of the following areas: 9 hours

Fine Arts, Foreign Languages, Mathematics (3 hours each)

College of Education Health and Physical Education Requirements 6 hours

HSPE 2000 2 hours

HSPE 2150 2 hours

HSPE Fitness/Activity Courses 2 courses

Professional Program Requirements 60 hours

ECED 3000, ECED 3100 4 hrs

ECED 3300 4 hrs

ECED 3400, ECED 3690, ECED 4000, ECED 4690 9 hrs

ECED 4790 10 hrs

ECED 4800 2 hrs

ENGL 4000, GEOG 3410, HSPE 3000 9 hrs

MATH 3160, PSYC 3120, SCI 3000, SPEC 3010 12 hrs

READ 3200, READ 4000, READ 4100 8 hrs

Any 3000 or 4000 course outside College of Education 2 hrs

Total Hours 126 hours

Using a variety of techniques, faculty members in the Department of Early Child hood and Reading Education assess the extent to which the program requirements address the desired outcomes. Examples of these assessments for the undergraduate program in Early Childhood Education include the following:

Examples of Outcome Assessments

1. Graduates are required to pass the Early Childhood Education Praxis II Ex amination before being recommended for certification. Results of the Praxis Examinations will be examined to determine the pass/fail rates of College of Education graduates based on statewide passing scores. The number of times graduates attempt to pass the test and subtest scores will also be examined.

2. Student teachers are assessed on professional teaching knowledge and skills related to the ten College of Education Conceptual Framework Principles through direct observations recorded on standard rating scales by university supervisors and public school mentors. In addition, required written assign ments will be assessed. Students teachers complete a post student teaching survey designed to identify program strengths and weaknesses and measure the extent to which specific College of Education outcomes are addressed.

3. Student teachers are assessed through observations by university supervisors and public school mentors and documentation contained in portfolios on their use of technological resources while planning, implementing, and assessing instruction.

4. Students, during practicum and student teaching experiences, are assessed on reflective teaching practices through the use of journals, videotapes, and con ferences with university supervisors during practicum and student teaching experiences. It is expected that teaching practices will be maintained, modi fied, or changed based on information available to students about the impact of practices on pupils, families, and other professional practitioners.

Department of Health, Physical

Education and Athletics

Dr. Stan Andrews, Acting Head

Room 168, Physical Education Complex

The Department of Health, Physical Education and Athletics offers degree pro grams that lead to a Bachelor of Science in Education Degree with a major in Health and Physical Education, a Bachelor of Science Degree with a major in Sports Medi cine, a Bachelor of Science in Health Fitness Degree, a Master of Education (Option I) Degree with T-5 (professional) certification in Health and Physical Education, and a Master of Education (Option II) Degree without teacher certification (for those stu dents who choose to concentrate their studies in the areas of exercise science, health fitness, sports medicine, and related fields).

Degree programs in the Department of Health, Physical Education and Athletics prepare students for professional careers in Health and Physical Education (teaching), Health Fitness, and Sports Medicine. The degree programs are designed to build basic concepts and skills appropriate for the specific degree program through a series of carefully sequenced courses, field experiences, and internships. These basic concepts and skills include, but are not limited to, program planning, computer applications and other technology applications, social diversity and appreciation for individual differ ences, assessment, and professional ethics.

The Bachelor of Science in Education Degree (B.S.Ed.) with a major in Health and Physical Education prepares students to teach health and physical education in grades prekindergarten through twelve (P-12). Upon successful completion of the degree pro

gram and posting a passing score on the Praxis II teacher certification exam in the area of health and physical education, students are eligible for the T-4 (professional) teach ing certificate from the state of Georgia. Both the undergraduate and graduate programs are approved by the National Council on Accreditation for Teacher Education (NCATE) and the National Association of Sport and Physical Education (NASPE).

The Bachelor of Science in Health Fitness (B.S.H.F.) Degree prepares students to work in a wide variety of clinical and non-clinical settings including cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, corporate fitness/wellness, hospital health promotion and outpatient re habilitation, human performance laboratories, private practice, community health education, and other related areas. Students are involved in classroom, laboratory, clinical, and field experiences that include theoretical and hands on experiences in clinical and non-clinical settings that often include health appraisal and education, exercise testing and prescription for the apparently healthy and the diseased population, and administrative leadership skills. Graduates are prepared and encouraged to sit for the Health Fitness Instructor or Exercise Specialist certification through the American Col lege of Sports Medicine (ACSM). The degree also prepares students for graduate studies in related areas.

The Bachelor of Science Degree with a major in Sports Medicine is a curriculum program certified and accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP). Successful completion of the degree program quali fies the student to sit for the National Athletic Trainers Association certification exam. Individuals posting a passing score on the exam are recognized as Certified Athletic Trainers. Being recognized as a Certified Athletic Trainer allows individuals to be licensed in their state of residence and work as an athletic trainer in clinical settings, public schools, professional sports, and colleges and universities. Students in the pro gram receive training under the direct supervision of one of the institution's NATA-certified athletic trainers in the areas of injury assessment, therapeutic exercise and modalities, advanced anatomy, biomechanics, kinesiology, and exercise physiol ogy.

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree with a Major in Health and Physical Education

The Health and Physical Education major has numerous desired educational out comes. Examples of the outcomes include:

Selected Educational Outcomes

1. Students who graduate from the Health and Physical Education teacher prepa ration program will demonstrate an acceptable level of content knowledge.

2. Students will demonstrate proficiency in a number of individual and team sport skills.

3. Students will demonstrate knowledge in the area of motor development, anatomy and physiology, and biomechanics of the human body.

4. Students will demonstrate their ability to successfully teach health and physi cal education to P-12 students and adapt activities for the individual needs of diverse and exceptional learners.

Requirements for the B.S. Ed. Degree with a Major

in Health and Physical Education

Core Areas A-E (See VSU Core Curriculum, pp. 95-98) 42 hours

Area F Requirements 18 hours

HSPE 2100, HSPE 2010 4 hours

BIOL 2651 4 hours

BVED 2400, CIED 2000, PSYC 2700 9 hours

HSPE 1010 1 hours

College of Education Health and Physical Education Requirements 6 hours

HSPE 2000 and HSPE 2150 4 hours

HSPE 2020 2 hours

Professional Program Requirements 60 hours

DAN 3400 1 hour HSPE 3150, HSPE 3300, HSPE 3450, HSPE 3400 8 hours

HSPE 3200, HSPE 3410, HSPE 3420, HSPE 3600 12 hours

HSPE 3690 1 hour

HSPE 3700, HSPE 3910 4 hours PSYC 3110, SPEC 3010 6 hours

Elective at the 3000 or 4000 level 3 hours

HSPE 3050 1 hour

HSPE 2030, HSPE 3350, HSPE 4220 6 hours

HSPE 4230, HSPE 4710, HSPE 4760 6 hours

HSPE 4790 10 hours

HSPE 4800 2 hours

Total Hours 126 hours

Various assessment techniques are used in the Health and Physical Education teacher certification program to determine the progress of the student and whether the program curriculum is meeting the stated objectives and goals.

Examples of Outcome Assessments

1. Students are required to pass the Health and Physical Education Praxis II Exams before they will be recommended for certification.

2. The student must pass skill tests in the required technique courses to show proficient ability in individual and team sport skills.

3. Through written exams, oral practicums, and micro-teaching assignments in advanced courses, students will demonstrate knowledge of motor develop ment, anatomy and physiology, and biomechanics of the human body.

4. The student must satisfactorily complete all pre-intern field based experiences and successfully complete the student teaching capstone course.

Bachelor of Science in Health Fitness (B.S.H.F.) Degree

The Bachelor of Science in Health Fitness Degree subscribes to the desired educa tional outcomes (knowledge, skill, and objectives) listed by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) that students should be able to demonstrate.

Selected Educational Outcomes

1. The student will be able to identify, recognize, and assess basic functional anatomy, biomechanics, and physiological responses to exercise.

2. The student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of nutrition and weight management in regard to health maintenance.

3. The student will be able to demonstrate administrative leadership skills for health and fitness programs in a variety of clinical and non-clinical settings.

4. The student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of assessment, planning, evaluation, and education of various populations in the private, corporate, and clinical setting regarding physical activity and healthy lifestyle issues.

Special Admission Requirements

Students are admitted into the BSHF degree program after

1. Completion of 45 semester hours of coursework.

2. Satisfactory completion of both sections of the Regents' Testing Program.

3. A grade of B or better in HSPE 2110.

4. Achieving a GPA of 2.5 in BSHF coursework, including the core curriculum.

Special Retention and Graduation Requirements

1. Maintain an overall GPA of 2.5 in all course work and hold current CPR certification.

2. Prior to enrolling in HSPE 4510 and HSPE 4550:

a. Complete the University Core and have a GPA of 2.5 in all BSFH course work , including the core curriculum.

b. GPA of 2.5 or higher in all Area F courses, including "elective."

c. Grade of "B" or higher in HSPE 1010.

d. Graduation check list returned from the Office of the Registrar

e. Have professional liability insurance and active CPR certification.

Probation and Dismissal

1. Students will be assigned an advisor in HSPE only after the minimal admis sions requirements are met. Students who are not admitted will not be allowed to take any 3000- or 4000-level courses in BSHF HSPE.

2. After admission to the BSHF program, students whose GPA falls below the minimal GPA requirement of 2.5 may repeat coursework within HSPE, but may not enroll in any new 300-or 4000-level HSPE courses. All require ments of item 2. in Special Retention and Graduation Requirements (above) must be met prior to enrollment in HSPE 4510 and HSPE 4550.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Health Fitness Degree

Core Areas A-E (See VSU Core Curriculum, pp. 95-98) 42 hours

Area F Requirements 18 hours

BIOL 2651, BIOL 2652 8 hours

BVED 2400 3 hours

HSPE 2110, HSPE 2150 4 hours

Elective 3 hours

College of Education Health and Physical Education Requirements 4 hours

HSPE 2000 2 hours

Two HSPE Fitness/Activity Courses 2 hours

Professional Program Requirements 60 hours

HSPE 3420, HSPE 3010, HSPE 3011 9 hours

HSPE 3050 1 hour

HSPE 3150, HSPE 3350 4 hours

HSPE 3360, HSPE 3370, HSPE 3430 9 hours

HSPE 1010 1 hour

HSPE 3200, HSPE 4010, HSPE 4050. HSPE 4070 12 hours HSPE 4080, HSPE 4090, HSPE 4130, HSPE 4510 12 hours

HSPE 4550 12 hours

Total Hours 124 hours

Various assessment techniques are used in the Health Fitness program to deter mine the progress of the student and whether the program curriculum is meeting the stated objectives and goals.

Examples of Outcome Assessments

1. The student will be able to pass written and oral examinations regarding ac ceptable protocols for a variety of health and fitness assessments.

2. The student will be able to interpret successfully the results of health and fitness assessments and demonstrate proficiency in exercise and nutrition pre scription for an individual program of health maintenance.

3. The student will successfully complete the capstone internship course.

4. The student will successfully complete the Health Fitness Instructor Certifi cation Exam or the Exercise Specialist Certification Exam offered by the American College of Sports Medicine.

Bachelor of Science with a Major in Sports Medicine

The Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA), and the Joint Review Committee on Athletic Training Educational Programs identify a number of specific educational outcomes necessary for accreditation and the preparation of students to become athletic trainers. Among those outcomes are:

Selected Educational Outcomes

1. The student will be able to demonstrate acceptable techniques for the preven tion and treatment of athletic injuries.

2. The student will exhibit knowledge in the recognition, evaluation, and imme diate care of athletic injuries.

3. The student will be able to plan the rehabilitation and reconditioning of indi viduals with athletic injuries.

4. The student will exhibit the knowledge to be able to perform as a competent athletic trainer and health care administrator.

Requirements for the B.S. Degree with a Major in Sports Medicine

Core Areas A-E (See VSU Core Curriculum, pp. 95-98) 42 hours

Area F Requirements 18 hours

BIOL 2651, BIOL 2652 8 hours

BVED 2400, PSYC 2700 6 hours

HSPE 2150, HSPE 2050 4 hours

College of Education Health and Physical Education Requirements 4 hours

HSPE 2000 2 hours

Two HSPE Fitness/Activity Courses 2 hours

Professional Program Requirements 60 hours

BVED 3430, HSPE 3200, HSPE 3420, HSPE 3430 12 hours HSPE 4300, HSPE 4350. HSPE 4360, HSPE 4400 12 hours

HSPE 3400 2 hours

HSPE 4250, HSPE 4450, HSPE 4490 9 hours

HSPE 3860 2 hours

Teacher Certification Options * 23 hours

(A) Teacher Certification Option

HSPE 4410, HSPE 4420 8 hours

PSYC 3110, SPEC 3010, CIED 200 9 hours

Electives 6 hours

or

(B) Teacher Certification and Internship

HSPE 4430 12 hours

PSYC 3110, SPEC 3010, CIED 2000 9 hours

Electives 2 hours

or

(C) Internship - No Teacher Certification

HSPE 4430 12 hours

Electives 11 hours

* Additional courses may be needed for other certification options.

Special Admission Requirements

1. Students may apply for positions in the program as they become availabale.

2. Applications will be judged on the following criteria:

a. Grade point average - 2.75 minimum

b. Grades in HSPE 2050, BIOL 2651, and HSPE 2150 as compared to those of other applicants

c. At least sophomore standing

d. Experience or clinical evaluations

e. Interview with sports medicine faculty, career goals, and r

ecommendation

3. Contact the Registrar's Office and have an official transcript sent to the cur riculum director

4. Complete the application form and return it to the curriculum director.

5. Contact three individuals to send letters of reference for you to the curriculum director. Their names should be used on the application form.

Special Retention Requirements

Retention:

1. Maintain a 2.75 cumulative GPA. Students whose GPA falls below 2.75 will be placed on probation for one term. During the probation period, students may continue to take sports medicine classes but will NOT be allowed to work in clinical experiences.

2. Evaluation for retention is done at the end of each year in the program.

Dismissal:

1. Falling below the 2.75 cumulative GPA and inability to achieve this require ment after one quarter of probation.

2. Poor performance in clinical experiences.

3. Poor year-end evaluation.

A variety of assessment techniques will be used in the Sports Medicine pro gram to determine the progress of the student and whether the program curriculum is meeting the stated objectives and goals.

Examples of Outcome Assessments

1. The student is required to demonstrate acceptable levels of skill in athletic training protocols such as taping, modalities, injury assessment, and injury prevention as assessed by the student=s clinical supervisor throughout their senior level course work as outlined by the National Athletic Trainers Asso ciation.

2. Through written and oral examinations, the student must be able to recognize and evaluate injuries accurately and describe the necessary steps for immedi ate care.

3. By way of oral examinations and demonstrations during clinical field experi ences, and practicums, the student will be able to describe and plan the rehabilitation and reconditioning of individuals with athletic injuries.

4. The student must have an exit interview with the program director to discuss strengths, weaknesses, and the overall ability of the student to perform as an athletic trainer and health care administrator. Upon graduation from the pro gram, the student is eligible to take the National Athletic Trainer Association Certification Examination.

Examples of Outcome Assessments

1. Graduates are required to pass the appropriate Praxis II Exam before they will be recommended for certification.

2. Student teachers are assessed on professional teaching knowledge and skills related to the ten College of Education Conceptual Framework Principles through direct observation recorded on a standard rating scale by college su pervisors and public school mentors. Written assignments required by individual programs are also assessed.

3. Students must submit professional teaching portfolios at the end of each field experience documenting the design and implementation of culturally respon sive instructional opportunities for all learners.

4. Students must submit professional teaching portfolios to document technol ogy integration. Evidence of electronic communication, the use of instructional software, technology presentations and assessment materials must be included.


DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION DISORDERS
Dr. Philip Gunter, Head
Room 175, Regional Education Center

The Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders is a multidis ciplinary department with a program that leads to a B.S. Ed. degree in Special Education or Communication Disorders.

The Bachelor of Science in Education degrees with a major in Special Education or in Communication Disorders is designed to introduce university students to the fields of special education and speech/language pathology and to allow them to develop skills for intervention with students and clients with disabilities and disorders. Within the Special Education area students have two options: mild disabilities or severe disabili ties. The B.S.Ed. degrees for all three option areas (mild disabilities, severe disabilities, and communication disorders) are preprofessional degrees. In order to be awarded certification for public school instruction or licensure for practice, students must com plete an advanced degree in one of the selected areas.

Each program in the Department has numerous desired outcomes. Examples of these outcomes include the following:

Selected Educational Outcomes

1. Students who graduate from teacher preparation programs will demonstrate an acceptable level of content knowledge in multiple disciplines.

2. Students in teacher preparation programs will demonstrate an acceptable level of teaching competency in their major areas by planning for the delivery and assessment of appropriate instruction and therapy in school and clinical set tings.

3. Students will plan for culturally responsive instructional opportunities with sensitivity to individual learners.

4. Students plan for the establishment and integration of technology into in struction, assessment, and communication.

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree with a

Major in Communication Disorders

Students admitted to the Communication Disorders program must have a 3.0GPA.

Core Areas A-E (See VSU Core Curriculum, pp. 95-98) 42 hours

College of Education Health and Physical Education Requirements 6 hours

HSPE 2000, HSPE 2150 4 hours

Two HSPE Fitness/Activity Courses 2 hours

Area F Requirements 18 hours

CIED 2000, BVED 2400, PSYC 2700 9 hours

Language Arts (Selected from any 2000 level course) 3 hours Math (Selected from any 1000 or 2000 level course) 3 hours Elective (Any 1000 or 2000 level course as

guided by advisor) 3 hours

Professional Education 60 hours

COMD 3010, COMD 3020, COMD 3040 9 hours COMD 3030 2 hours COMD 3050 1 hour SPEC 3010, COMD 3060, COMD 3070, COMD 3080 12 hours

COMD 3090 2 hours

PSYC 3110 3 hours

COMD 4010, COMD 4020, COMD 4040 9 hours

COMD 4030 1 hour

SPEC 4060, COMD 4060, COMD 4070 9 hours

COMD 4050, COMD 4090 4 hours

COMD 4080 4 hours

COMD 4100 1 hourr

Guided Elective 3 hours

Total hours 126 hours

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree with a

Major in Special Education (Mild Disabilities)

Core Areas A-E (See VSU Core Curriculum, pp. 95-98) 42 hours

College of Education Health and Physical Education Requirements 6 hours

HSPE 2000, HSPE 2150 4 hours

Two HSPE Fitness/Activity Courses 2 hours

Area F Requirements 18 hours

CIED 2000, BVED 2400, PSYC 2700 9 hours

Language Arts (Selected from any 2000 level course) 3 hours Math (Selected from any 1000 or 2000 level course) 3 hours Elective (Any 1000 or 2000 level course as

guided by advisor) 3 hours

Professional Education 60 hours

PSYC 3110, SPEC 3010, SPEC 3020 9 hours

SPEC 3030, SPEC 3040 4 hours

SPEC 3050, COMD 3070, VOED 3650 9 hours

SPEC 3060, SPEC 3070 4 hours

Guided Electives 4 hours

SPEC 4020 2 hours

SPEC 4040 4 hours

SPEC 4060, SPEC 4110 6 hours

SPEC 4140 1 hour

SPEC 4160 2 hours

SPEC 4180, READ 4530 6 hours

Additional Guided Electives 9 hours

Total hours 126 hours

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree with a

Major in Special Education (Severe Disabilities)

Core Areas A-E (See VSU Core Curriculum, pp. 95-98) 42 hours

College of Education Health and Physical Education Requirements 6 hours

HSPE 2000, HSPE 2150 4 hours

Two HSPE Fitness/Activity Courses 2 hours

Area F Requirements 18 hours

CIED 2000, BVED 2400, PSYC 2700 9 hours

Language Arts (Selected from any 2000 level course) 3 hours Math (Selected from any 1000 or 2000 level course) 3 hours Elective (Any 1000 or 2000 level course as

guided by advisor) 3 hours

Professional Education 60 hours

PSYC 3110, SPEC 3010, SPEC 3020 9 hours

SPEC 3030, SPEC 3040 4 hours

SPEC 3050, COMD 3070, VOED 3650 9 hours

SPEC 3060, SPEC 3070 4 hours

Guided Electives 4 hours

SPEC 4010, SPEC 4030, SPEC 4051 9 hours

SPEC 4070, SPEC 4090, SPEC 4100, SPEC 4130 8 hours

SPEC 4152, READ 4530 6 hours

SPEC 4170 2 hours

Additional Guided Electives 5 hours

Total hours 126 hours

Student outcomes for the Bachelor of Science in Education degree in Special Edu cation and in Communication Disorders are assessed by multiple instruments and methods.

Examples of Outcome Assessments

1. Content knowledge is assessed through objective and narrative written ex aminations and oral presentations.

2. Planning for the application of content knowledge is assessed through perfor mance assessments completed via observations by university and public school professionals and private service providers using clinical observation and feed back instruments to determine if plans include appropriate College of Education Principles.

3. Students' plans for culturally responsive instructional with sensitivity to indi vidual learners will be evaluated by university personnel to ensure individual needs are met.

4. Students' plans for the establishment and integration of technology into in struction, assessment, and communication will be evaluated through their replications of integration by university personnel who will test the applica tions and provide feedback to students regarding the satisfaction of the procedure.




 

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Submitted by: Chief Compiler: Date:
Valdosta State University
1500 N. Patterson St.
Valdosta, GA  31698-0102
Susan R. Worth
sworth@valdosta.edu
Phone: 912-333-5932
Fax: 912-333-7167
February 1, 1999

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